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Tag: Quantum

New quantum thermometer can measure a fever in a tiny worm

New quantum thermometer can measure a fever in a tiny worm

Science
Sept. 11 (UPI) -- Scientists have successfully outfitted an optical microscope with quantum sensors, creating a precise microscope-based thermometer, capable of sensing a "fever" in tiny nematode worms. Quantum systems are extremely sensitive to their surrounding environs, making them ideal for measuring in vivo temperature changes. Optical microscopes allow scientists to image microscopic structures in biological samples, and when combined with fluorescent biomarkers, can be used to observe biological processes. Advertisement In a new proof-of-concept study, researchers at Osaka City University combined the two technologies in order to observe biological systems and processes in which heat and temperature play an important role. "Our system effectively integrates fast particle tracking a...
Breakthrough extends quantum state stability by 10,000 times

Breakthrough extends quantum state stability by 10,000 times

Science
Aug. 14 (UPI) -- Scientists in Chicago have developed a way to keep quantum states operating for longer periods of time -- a breakthrough they say could accelerate the development of quantum communication, computing and sensing. Hundreds of studies have hinted at the power of quantum mechanics, and scientists have predicted quantum technologies will provide a speed boost to computers, beef up cyber security, enhance the resolution of astronomical images and more. Advertisement For now, however, these applications remain relegated to the realm of theory. While scientists have successfully created quantum systems, they have proven delicate, unstable and frequently finicky. One of the challenges of building useful quantum technologies is that most quantum systems remain operational, or "cohe...
Physicists observe quantum entanglement of 15 trillion atoms

Physicists observe quantum entanglement of 15 trillion atoms

Science
May 15 (UPI) -- Scientists have observed an unexpectedly large quantum system featuring 15 trillion entangled atoms, according to a new study. Quantum entanglement describes the connection between separate particles. The phenomenon is key to the promise of quantum computing, quantum encryption and other quantum technologies. Usually, quantum entanglement features a pair of coupled atoms or electrons. Entangled states are quite delicate. To ensure entangled particles remain undisturbed, many quantum systems must be isolated and kept at temperatures approaching absolute zero, limiting their practical viability. For the new study, published Friday in Nature Communications, researchers heated a cloud of gas atoms to temperatures upwards of 450 Kelvin. The atoms were far from isolated. Every ...
Google claims ‘quantum supremacy’ for computer

Google claims ‘quantum supremacy’ for computer

Science
Google says an advanced computer has achieved "quantum supremacy" for the first time, surpassing the performance of conventional devices.The technology giant's Sycamore quantum processor was able to perform a specific task in 200 seconds that would take the world's best supercomputers 10,000 years to complete.Scientists have been working on quantum computers for decades because they promise much faster speeds.The result appears in Nature journal.In classical computers, the unit of information is called a "bit" and can have a value of either 1 or 0. But its equivalent in a quantum system - the qubit (quantum bit) - can be both 1 and 0 at the same time.This phenomenon opens the door for multiple calculations to be performed simultaneously. But the qubits ne...
New quantum technology enables light manipulation at greater scales

New quantum technology enables light manipulation at greater scales

Science
Sept. 27 (UPI) -- To develop the next generation of quantum technologies, scientists need to find new ways to manipulate light. In a new paper, published Friday in the journal NPJ Quantum Information, an international group of scientists claim to have done precisely that. According to lead author Omar Magaña-Loaiza, an assistant professor in the department of physics and astronomy at the Louisiana State University, the breakthrough could inspire quantum technologies with applications in imaging, computation, communication and cryptography. The new method for controlling light could also aid the field of metrology, the science of measurement. "If we're able to control photon fluctuations and associated noise," Magaña-Loaiza said in a news release. "Then, we can make more precise measurem