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Tag: remotely

Surgeon used 5G network to operate remotely on animal

Surgeon used 5G network to operate remotely on animal

Technology
A doctor in China has become the first to perform remote control surgery over a super-fast 5G network. The surgeon, who manipulated two robotic arms, was 30 miles from an operating theatre in Fujian province.During the procedure, he removed a laboratory animal's liver, the South China Morning Post reported.The 5G system, which is said to be at least 10 times as fast as current networks, and perhaps even up to a hundred times, has a lag time of only 0.1 seconds.That meant the delay between the surgeon's movements, and the robot in the theatre, was short enough to avoid potentially dangerous mistakes.In future, it is hoped such technology will enable surgeons to work remotely in war zones and disaster areas.It will also allow specialists from large hospitals to assist more ju...
Vermont will pay people $10,000 to move there and work remotely

Vermont will pay people $10,000 to move there and work remotely

Finance
6 places that will pay you to live there Calling all remote workers: Vermont has a deal for you. The state has a new law that will pay workers to move there and work remotely. Governor Phil Scott signed the legislation on Wednesday. Eligible workers can get up to $ 5,000 a year, not to exceed $ 10,000 over two years, through the state's new remote worker grant program. The money can be used on qualified expenses, including costs to relocate, necessary computer equipment and software, internet access and co-working memberships. Related: Why working from home could increase your tax bill Vermont has a small and aging population, according to Joan Goldstein, commissioner of economic development for Vermont. "We recognize the need to recruit people to the state, and t...
Smartphone app allows doctors, nurses to remotely monitor wound healing

Smartphone app allows doctors, nurses to remotely monitor wound healing

Health
Jan. 19 (UPI) -- The healing of postoperative surgical wounds can be effectively monitored with a new smartphone app, new research indicates.The app, called WoundCheck, can be used to send digital images of a post-surgical wound with a short patient-administered questionnaire to monitoring nurses and could help reduce the need for post-surgical patient readmission, researchers report in a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute."We set out to come up with a protocol where patients could become active participants in their care and allow us to be in closer communication and monitor their wounds after they leave the hospital," Dr. Rebecca L. Gunter, a general surgery resident at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, said in a press release....