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North Korea adds new twist to big parade: Reporter's notebook

North Korea adds new twist to big parade: Reporter's notebook

World
I've seen many military parades around the world, but nothing that rivals the spectacle of Sunday's parade in Pyongyang. There were tens of thousands of North Korean troops -- goose-stepping under leader Kim Jong Un's viewing balcony in Pyongyang's Kim II Sung Square. And tens of thousands of civilians in the parade marking the 70th anniversary of North Korea's founding as well. We were in the massive square named after Kim's grandfather, the country's founding leader. Kim was just above us, waving at the adoring crowds below, whose emotions seemed genuine as they sat in the hot sun waiting for a glimpse of their "Supreme Leader." Despite the display of military might, which included tank battalions, rocket launcher and military aircraft that formed the number 70th above the square, ...
Reporter's Notebook: The new Hippocratic oath

Reporter's Notebook: The new Hippocratic oath

Health
This spring, nearly 20,000 medical students will graduate from medical schools across the country and will likely be asked to raise their hands for a new kind of Hippocratic Oath, one that now emphasizes a patient’s right to choose their own destiny. The Hippocratic oath is a 2,500-year-old pledge doctors take outlining the professional duties and ethical principles the profession holds sacred. The first modern version of the Hippocratic oath was adopted in 1948. The version released in November by the World Medical Association in Chicago took two years to finalize and is the ancient text’s first ever major update. A new name was proposed as well: “The Physician’s Pledge.” In a Journal of the American Medical Association article, Dr. Ramin Walter Parsa-Parsi, chair of the World Medical
Reporter's Notebook: Fukushima face-lift masks morass inside

Reporter's Notebook: Fukushima face-lift masks morass inside

Technology
Above ground, the tsunami-hit Fukushima nuclear power plant has had a major face-lift since the 2011 disaster. Inside and underground remains largely a morass. A stylish new office building was the first thing that came into view during a tour for foreign media last month. Another building has a cafeteria and a convenience store. It's easy to forget you're in the official no-go zone, where access is restricted. We first went through automated security checks and radiation measurement at the new building, where 1,000 employees of Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s decommissioning unit work. A sign prohibits games such as Pokemon Go. Visitors no longer must put on hazmat suits and full-face charcoal-filter masks, or plastic shoe covers, unless they are going to the most contaminated areas. We donne...