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Tag: Rescuers

Rescuers free South African baby from storm drain

Rescuers free South African baby from storm drain

Business
Feb. 11 (UPI) -- Authorities in South Africa rescued a newborn baby that had been trapped in a storm drain for several hours Monday afternoon. The newborn girl, whom doctors believe is no more than 3 days old, was diagnosed with mild hypothermia at a local hospital after she was freed from the drain in the city of Durban. Hospital staff declared her survival a "miracle," as she was discovered after passersby heard the faint sounds of her crying. People used their cupboard doors to form makeshift barriers to hold back dirt around rescuers as they worked to free the infant. "The main problem was that she was very cold," Timothy Hardcastle, a doctor at Chief Albert Luthuli Hospital, told News 24. "We warmed her up and washed off dust and cleaned her abrasions. Our colleagues from pediatrics ...
With all odds against them, here's how rescuers pulled off 'miracle' Thai cave feat

With all odds against them, here's how rescuers pulled off 'miracle' Thai cave feat

World
The steel air tanks glittered under the beams of floodlights as a pair of rescuers defogged their masks and adjusted the straps. They checked their regulators one last time before embarking on what would become their most famous dive. In the jubilant aftermath of the successful rescues of 12 boys and their soccer coach, the Royal Thai Navy SEALs posted a video on Facebook Wednesday showing the miraculous mission as it unfolded over three days deep in the Tham Luang Nang Non cave in northern Thailand. The first diver wearing a helmet to avoid smashing his head against the mostly low roof the cave gripped a safety rope with a left gloved hand and vanished into the murky water flowing through the narrow passage of the cavern toward where the wayward group was marooned on a small beach. ...
Rescuers begin process of removing boys from cave in Thailand

Rescuers begin process of removing boys from cave in Thailand

World
Rescuers in Thailand have begun the process of removing the 12 boys and their soccer coach who have been trapped in a cave for two weeks, according to the Chiang Rai governor. Authorities said at a press conference Sunday morning in Chiang Rai province that they made the decision to rescue the boys as oxygen drops and the threat of monsoon rains approaches. Due to the length of the journey out of the cave, officials said the first boy was expected to come out at 9 p.m. local time, which is 10 a.m. Sunday Eastern time. The officials said the operation could take two or three days. At 10 a.m. local time, 13 foreign divers and five Thai SEALs entered the cave to begin the operation. Two divers will escort each of the kids out of the cave. "We have a fraction of a second to help them come ...
Thailand cave: Rescuers in race against weather as rains close in

Thailand cave: Rescuers in race against weather as rains close in

World
Rescuers in Thailand are racing against the rains to free 12 boys and their football coach trapped in a flooded cave in Thailand.A deluge is expected to hit in a matter of days and could force the water level up, threatening to flood the pocket where the group has taken refuge.The boys, aged 11-16, and their coach have been trapped since 23 June.They are believed to have entered the cave when it was dry, before sudden heavy rains blocked the exit.The group was found on Monday night by two British rescuer divers, on a rock shelf about 4km (2.5 miles) from the mouth of the cave. What are the rescue options? Community of hope springs up outside cave The region of Chiang Rai where the boys are trapped has for the past few days experi...
Rescuers weigh options for extracting soccer team from flooded cave

Rescuers weigh options for extracting soccer team from flooded cave

World
Jubilation turned to trepidation Tuesday as rescuers faced the daunting task of figuring out how to extract 12 boys and their soccer coach from a jungle cave in Thailand where they were found alive after being trapped by floodwaters for 10 days. Officials cautioned that the rescue is not complete and could take "weeks or months" before the once-wayward group is removed from a sweltering subterranean labyrinth full of perilous twists, narrow passages and completely flooded areas that even well-trained Navy SEALS found challenging to maneuver through. "We need to be careful not to rush; as long as they are safe and strong, then they are in good hands," Thai Prime Minister Tryut Chan-o-cha told reporters. "We can now reach and communicate with them, so they are in our sights." Technicia...