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Tag: research

Sahara has grown 10% in 100 years, research finds

Sahara has grown 10% in 100 years, research finds

Science
March 30 (UPI) -- Africa's Sahara Desert has grown 10 percent in nearly 100 years, according to a new study by scientists at the University of Maryland.The Sahara, which is the world's largest warm-weather desert and roughly equal in size to the contiguous United States with 3.6 million square miles, has expanded by 11 percent to 18 percent depending on the season.The study was published Thursday in the American Meteorological Society's Journal of Climate.The researchers analyzed annual rainfall data recorded throughout Africa until 2013. When the average rainfall is less than 4 inches of rain per year or less, an area is considered a desert."The trends in Africa of hot summers getting hotter and rainy seasons drying out are linked with factors that include increasing greenhouse gases and ...
Research: Blood thinner reduces risk after heart damage in surgery

Research: Blood thinner reduces risk after heart damage in surgery

Health
March 12 (UPI) -- A blood-thinning drug significantly reduces the risk of complications from a heart injury after major non-cardiac surgery, report researchers in Canada.Researchers found dabigatran was effective in the first randomized controlled study to evaluate ways to reduce such heart injuries, according to study results presented last week at the American College of Cardiology's annual conference in Orlando last week. Dabigatran is sold under the brand name Pradaxa, which is made by Boehringer Ingelheim, a drugmaker that helped fund the study.The study was conducted by the Population Health Research Institute of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences in Ontario, Canada."We now have an option for improving outcomes for a large population of people who have a heart injury af...
Legal medical pot doesn't lead to increased use in teens, research shows

Legal medical pot doesn't lead to increased use in teens, research shows

Health
With medical marijuana already legal in 29 states and even more states considering legalization, some believe that the inevitable next step is an increase in recreational marijuana use among adolescents, but a new study published today in Addiction busted that myth. “We had done an earlier study published in the Lancet in 2015 of a million adolescents that were surveyed yearly between 1991 and 2014, and found no increase in teen use of cannabis or marijuana. We were surprised by that result,” said Dr. Deborah S. Hasin, an author of the study and professor of epidemiology at Columbia University. But despite a series of similar studies with the same result, she said, “People were so convinced that medical marijuana laws were going to increase teen use so they questioned the relationship.”
Alzheimer's disease reversed in mice, offering hope for humans, new research shows

Alzheimer's disease reversed in mice, offering hope for humans, new research shows

Health
"Remarkable" -- that’s how researchers are describing the results of a new study done on mice displaying traits associated with Alzheimer's disease. The deletion of just a single enzyme saw the near total reversal of the deposition of amyloid plaques found in brains of those with Alzheimer's, improving cognitive functions in the mouse subjects, according to the study from researchers at the Cleveland Clinic, published Feb. 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. These promising research findings center around deleting a gene that produces an enzyme called BACE1, which helps make the beta-amyloid peptides that accumulate abnormally in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. Studies have shown that stopping or reducing that enzyme’s activity dramatically reduces production of b
Pollution particles fuel large storms, research shows

Pollution particles fuel large storms, research shows

Science
Jan. 26 (UPI) -- New research suggests scientists have underestimated the importance of particulate matter as a driver of storm size and intensity.Scientists have previously proven that aerosols, particles suspended in the atmosphere, can influence weather and climate. With their latest study -- published this week in the journal Science -- researchers with the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory showed the smallest particles can encourage the formation and increase the intensity of storms."We showed that the presence of these particles is one reason why some storms become so strong and produce so much rain," PNNL researcher Jiwen Fan, lead author of the new study, said in a news release. "In a warm and humid area where atmospheric conditions are otherwise very cle...