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Tag: research

Japan slams Chinese ship for oceanographic research in EEZ

World
Oct. 8 (UPI) -- A Chinese oceanographic research ship conducted activities in Japan's Exclusive Economic Zone without prior notice, according to a Japanese press report. NHK reported Monday the ship was active near Hateruma Island, Okinawa Prefecture, and the vessel entered Japan-clamed waters around 4:20 p.m. Sunday. The ship was in an area about 120 miles southeast of Hateruma. The vessel was identified as the Xiangyanghong, No. 10, and was seen lowering a steel rope into the ocean, according to Japan's maritime security. The activity was observed from a Japanese surveillance plane. The Japanese coast guard said the Chinese vessel was conducting some kind of investigation. Conducting activities within Japan's EEZ without receiving prior permission is inadmissible, the coast guard said....
Research finds potential treatment for obesity, diabetes

Research finds potential treatment for obesity, diabetes

Health
Aug. 9 (UPI) -- Researchers have identified a potential target to treat obesity and diabetes through regulation of energy in the body, according to a study of mice. In findings released Thursday in JCI Insight, researchers from the Colorado School of Medicine outline the biological function of an epigenetic modifier known as histone deacetylase and its potential as a treatment target. White adipose tissue stores energy and brown adipose tissue produces heat, which in turn expends energy. By increasing energy amounts, the researchers believe a regulatory node could lead to new drugs to treat obesity and diabetes. They learned that deleting HDAC11 in mice stimulates brown adipose tissue formation and the absence of the modifier also triggered beiging of white adipose tissue. "Through our i...
Research: Progress lagging in transplanted kidney survival

Research: Progress lagging in transplanted kidney survival

Health
July 24 (UPI) -- Despite an improved lifespan of transplanted kidneys during the past 30 years, progress is stagnating, according to an international study. Researchers studied data from 108,787 recipients of kidney transplants from 1986-2016 at 135 hospitals across 21 European countries. The findings were published Monday in the journal Kidney International. Between 1986 and 1999, 87 percent of them functioned after one year and 75 percent after five years. From 2006 to 2015, it had improved to 92 percent after one year and 84 percent after five years. But according to kidney special Dr. Maarten Naesens of Leuven and University Hospitals Leuven, that is not good enough. "For the most part, this progress was made in the period 1986-2000," Naesens said. "Unfortunately, we haven't seen muc...
Neanderthals could start their own fires, new research proves

Neanderthals could start their own fires, new research proves

Science
July 19 (UPI) -- Neanderthals weren't dependent on lightning strikes and natural wildfires for their flames, new research suggests. The early human relatives were able to start their own fires. When researchers found microscopic wear on flint hand-axes collected at Neanderthal archaeological sites, they recognized the signature of flint striking found around the hearths of early human settlements. "I recognized this type of wear from my earlier experimental work," archaeologist Andrew Sorensen, professor at Leiden University in the Netherlands, said in a news release. "These are the traces you get if you try to generate sparks by striking a piece of flint against a piece of pyrite." The hand-axes, however, were much older than the fire-making tools Sorensen had previously analyzed. In th...
Sea level rise threatens internet infrastructure, new research shows

Sea level rise threatens internet infrastructure, new research shows

Science
July 17 (UPI) -- Sea level rise threatens the internet, according to a new study by researchers at the universities of Wisconsin and Oregon. Thousands of miles of fiber optic cable are laid beneath several major coastal cities. Large swaths of this vital communications infrastructure could be underwater in less than 15 years, researchers warn. "Most of the damage that's going to be done in the next 100 years will be done sooner than later," Paul Barford, a professor of computer science at Wisconsin, said in a news release. Most people use wireless technology to connect to the world wide web, and cloud computing remains a popular buzzword, but the internet remains rooted in the ground. In addition to cables, rising seas could damage data centers, traffic exchanges and termination points, ...