News That Matters

Tag: research

Raytheon tapped by DARPA for high frequency digital communications research

Raytheon tapped by DARPA for high frequency digital communications research

Business
Nov. 6 (UPI) -- Raytheon has been awarded an $ 11.5 million contract for development work on the Millimeter-Wave Digital Arrays program, an effort by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Activity program to enhance military communication security. The contract, announced Monday by the Department of Defense, will see Raytheon focus on digital tile architecture and scalable apertures with transmit and receive components for the MIDAS program. Phased-arrays operating at very high frequency millimeter wave are already being researched as part of the emerging 5G cellular network. As opposed to military communications, civilian systems are designed for relatively short ranges and simplicity of use. Department of Defense networks need to operate in much more complex communications scenarios in...
Navy opens facility for submarine-launched ballistic missile research

Navy opens facility for submarine-launched ballistic missile research

Business
Nov. 6 (UPI) -- The Navy has opened a new Missile Support Facility in Dahlgren, Va., that will focus sub-launched ballistic missiles and the Columbia-class nuclear submarine program. The new facility, which opened last week and was announced by the Navy on Tuesday, will be part of the Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division. It features top of the line labs and equipment for over 300 NSWCDD Strategic and Computing Systems Department scientists, engineers and other technical experts on current and pending ballistic missiles. During remarks at the opening, the Navy's director of strategic systems, Vice Adm. Johnny Wolfe, called the Missile Support Facility vital to the SLBM program, which is responsible for the Trident II submarine launched ballistic missile -- one of the legs of the...

Japan slams Chinese ship for oceanographic research in EEZ

World
Oct. 8 (UPI) -- A Chinese oceanographic research ship conducted activities in Japan's Exclusive Economic Zone without prior notice, according to a Japanese press report. NHK reported Monday the ship was active near Hateruma Island, Okinawa Prefecture, and the vessel entered Japan-clamed waters around 4:20 p.m. Sunday. The ship was in an area about 120 miles southeast of Hateruma. The vessel was identified as the Xiangyanghong, No. 10, and was seen lowering a steel rope into the ocean, according to Japan's maritime security. The activity was observed from a Japanese surveillance plane. The Japanese coast guard said the Chinese vessel was conducting some kind of investigation. Conducting activities within Japan's EEZ without receiving prior permission is inadmissible, the coast guard said....
Research finds potential treatment for obesity, diabetes

Research finds potential treatment for obesity, diabetes

Health
Aug. 9 (UPI) -- Researchers have identified a potential target to treat obesity and diabetes through regulation of energy in the body, according to a study of mice. In findings released Thursday in JCI Insight, researchers from the Colorado School of Medicine outline the biological function of an epigenetic modifier known as histone deacetylase and its potential as a treatment target. White adipose tissue stores energy and brown adipose tissue produces heat, which in turn expends energy. By increasing energy amounts, the researchers believe a regulatory node could lead to new drugs to treat obesity and diabetes. They learned that deleting HDAC11 in mice stimulates brown adipose tissue formation and the absence of the modifier also triggered beiging of white adipose tissue. "Through our i...
Research: Progress lagging in transplanted kidney survival

Research: Progress lagging in transplanted kidney survival

Health
July 24 (UPI) -- Despite an improved lifespan of transplanted kidneys during the past 30 years, progress is stagnating, according to an international study. Researchers studied data from 108,787 recipients of kidney transplants from 1986-2016 at 135 hospitals across 21 European countries. The findings were published Monday in the journal Kidney International. Between 1986 and 1999, 87 percent of them functioned after one year and 75 percent after five years. From 2006 to 2015, it had improved to 92 percent after one year and 84 percent after five years. But according to kidney special Dr. Maarten Naesens of Leuven and University Hospitals Leuven, that is not good enough. "For the most part, this progress was made in the period 1986-2000," Naesens said. "Unfortunately, we haven't seen muc...