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Fear, mistrust drive vaccination hesitancy, researchers say

Fear, mistrust drive vaccination hesitancy, researchers say

Health
July 18 (UPI) -- After more than 11,000 died from the Ebola outbreak in Africa, fear of infection reverberated across the globe to the United States. Despite those concerns, half of Americans reported a hesitation or outright refusal to take an anti-Ebola vaccine, according to a study published Thursday in Heliyon. "Facing a raising number of epidemics that create public health dangers, our findings indicate that vaccine hesitancy is associated with social factors that are independent of the perceived effectiveness of vaccines," Kent P. Schwirian, emeritus professor of Sociology at The Ohio State University and study author, said in a news release. "Willingness to take vaccination is positively associated with a generalized sense of fear, trust in the government's ability to control an o...
Army researchers improve battery safety with new cathode chemistry

Army researchers improve battery safety with new cathode chemistry

Science
May 10 (UPI) -- Scientists with the U.S. Army have developed a new type of cathode chemistry that makes batteries safer and more efficient. Currently, soldiers must regularly carry batteries weighing between 15 and 20 pounds. But thanks to a new type of cathode and electrolyte, soldiers could soon be carrying safer and more efficient batteries weighing half as much. Army researchers were able to boost lithium-ion battery energy density by using a totally aqueous electrolyte. The electrolyte is free of transition metal and boasts high capacity energy storage. "Such a high energy, safe and potentially flexible new battery will likely give the Soldiers what they need on the battlefield: reliable high energy source with robust tolerance against abuse," Kang Xu, senior scientist at the U.S. Ar...
Parkinson’s results beyond researchers’ wildest dreams

Parkinson’s results beyond researchers’ wildest dreams

Health
Media playback is unsupported on your device A treatment that has restored the movement of patients with chronic Parkinson's disease has been developed by Canadian researchers. Previously housebound patients are now able to walk more freely as a result of electrical stimulation to their spines.A quarter of patients have difficulty walking as the disease wears on, often freezing on the spot and falling.Parkinson's UK hailed its potential impact on an aspect of the disease where there is currently no treatment.Prof Mandar Jog, of Western University in London, Ontario, told BBC News the scale of benefit to patients of his new treatment was "beyond his wildest dreams". "Most of our patien...
Researchers restore functions to pig brains hours after death

Researchers restore functions to pig brains hours after death

Science
April 17 (UPI) -- Using a solution created to preserve brain tissue and an artificial circulatory system called BrainEx, scientists at the Yale School of Medicine were able to restore some basic cellular functions inside several pigs' brains hours after death. The breakthrough is the latest evidence of cellular resiliency in postmortem tissue. Last year, scientists observed cells continuing to express genes up to 48 hours after death. The latest study suggests a variety of brain functions thought to end within seconds of death -- as a result of a lack of blood and oxygen -- can actually be restored hours later. "The intact brain of a large mammal retains a previously underappreciated capacity for restoration of circulation and certain molecular and cellular activities multiple hours afte...

Researchers find more cases of Facebook app data exposure

Technology
Security researchers have uncovered more instances of Facebook user data being publicly exposed on the internet, further underscoring its struggles as it deals with a slew of privacy problems. The researchers from the firm UpGuard said in a blog post Wednesday that the data, which included user names and passwords, came from two different Facebook apps that stored their data publicly on Amazon's cloud services. Facebook says the databases have been taken down. But the episode illustrates Facebook's issues with controlling its users' data, especially once it is in the hands of third-party developers. The databases were from a Mexico-based media company called Cultura Colectiva, which included more than 540 million records — like user comments and likes — and from an app called At t