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TalkRadio: YouTube reverses decision to ban channel

TalkRadio: YouTube reverses decision to ban channel

Technology
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CDC reverses new guidelines again on indoor COVID-19 spread

CDC reverses new guidelines again on indoor COVID-19 spread

Health
Sept. 21 (UPI) -- U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials continued to modify the agency's guidelines on COVID-19 Monday, this time pulling down a days-old change suggesting that the virus can spread from person to person among those greater than 6 feet apart, particularly indoors. The agency's guidance has long said that respiratory droplets, emitted from the nose and mouth of an infected person, "are the main way the virus spreads." Advertisement But an update posted Friday said these microscopic particles could travel distances greater than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated indoor spaces, like "restaurants and fitness classes." That language, however, was removed late Monday morning. A top CDC official told the Washington Post that the information "does not r...
Study: Topical minoxidil reverses hair loss caused by radiation for brain, head, neck cancers

Study: Topical minoxidil reverses hair loss caused by radiation for brain, head, neck cancers

Health
Aug. 5 (UPI) -- Treatment with topical minoxidil helps restore hair loss caused by radiation treatment for brain tumors and other head and neck cancers, a study published Wednesday by JAMA Dermatology found. Twenty-eight of 34 patients treated with the drug after radiation therapy experienced hair regrowth in as little as three weeks, researchers said. Advertisement Minoxidil is an over-the-counter medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for hair regrowth in men and women. The patients suffered from persistent radiation-induced alopecia, or hair loss, as a result of cancer treatment, the researchers said. The hair loss from radiation is "a dose-dependent phenomenon," and was linked specifically to higher doses of radiation applied to the scalp, researchers at Memoria...
NIH: Drug reverses liver fat, slows fibrosis in HIV-positive people

NIH: Drug reverses liver fat, slows fibrosis in HIV-positive people

Health
Oct. 15 (UPI) -- The National Institutes of Health said Tuesday that researchers have found a new drug that can reduce liver fat and prevent progression of liver fibrosis in people with HIV. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a growing cause of serious liver problems in HIV-positive people with 25 percent of HIV-positive people impacted, according to a report released earlier this year. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the National Cancer Institute, both part of the NIH, conducted the new study with researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The injectable hormone tesamorelin reduces liver fat in HIV-positive people, the NIH researchers and MGH colleagues reported, adding the drug also prevents liver fibrosis and scarring. "Many people livi...
‘Rewiring nerves’ reverses hand and arm paralysis

‘Rewiring nerves’ reverses hand and arm paralysis

Health
Media playback is unsupported on your device Nerves inside paralysed people's bodies have been "rewired" to give movement to their arms and hands, say Australian surgeons. Patients can now feed themselves, put on make-up, turn a key, handle money and type at a computer. Paul Robinson, 36 from Brisbane, said the innovative surgery had given him independence he had never imagined. Completely normal function has not been restored, but doctors say the improvement is life-changing.How does the procedure work?Injuries to the spinal cord stop messages getting from the brain to control the rest of the body. The impact is paralysis.Patients in the trial had quadriplegia affecting movement in all their limbs.But crucially they were still able to move so...