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Tag: rice

Rice 'safely conserved' in Philippines gene bank

Rice 'safely conserved' in Philippines gene bank

Science
Scientists say that more than 100 thousand varieties of rice have been safeguarded for the future.Samples in the world's largest rice gene bank in the Philippines are being used to help farmers develop rice crops that can survive drought and flooding.The International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) gene bank has secured permanent funding from the Crop Trust.It is part of international efforts to store seeds in gene banks to protect food supplies in a warming world."These seeds are miracles - we believe that in this natural diversity of rice you have almost any trait that you would want to look for," said Marie Haga, executive director of the international non-profit organisation, the Crop Trust.She said rice is relatively easy to...
Greenhouse gas emissions on rice farms underestimated, study finds

Greenhouse gas emissions on rice farms underestimated, study finds

Science
Sept. 10 (UPI) -- Climate scientists and policy makers have underestimated the amount of greenhouse gas emitted by rice farms. New research showed rice farms emit significant amounts of nitrous oxide in addition to methane. In recent years, policy makers have worked with rice farmers to reduce methane emissions and conserve water resources by deploying intermittent flooding. As water resources become more scarce, more continually flooded rice farms are likely to adopt intermittent flooding methods. But new research -- published this week in the journal Proceedings. of the National Academy of Sciences -- suggests the reduction in methane emissions achieved by intermittent flooding is undermined by increases in nitrous oxide emissions. "Water management on rice farms needs to be calibrated ...
Climate change is robbing rice of its nutrition

Climate change is robbing rice of its nutrition

Science
May 25 (UPI) -- As carbon dioxide concentrations in Earth's atmosphere increase, the nutritional value of rice will decline, new research shows. Researchers with the University of Tokyo tracked rice growth at experimental field sites across Japan and China. A system of pipes delivered different levels of CO2 to the rice plants. Wind sensors and gas detectors helped scientists ensure each plant was exposed to the correct amount of CO2. Scientists analyzed rice samples from the experimental plants, measuring the amounts of iron, zinc, protein, and vitamins B1, B2, B5, and B9 found in each. Their data revealed an inverse relationship between CO2 levels and nutritional qualities -- the higher the CO2 level, the lower the levels of vitamins and minerals. Researchers published the findings thi...