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Tag: rights

Premier League raises less from TV rights auction

Premier League raises less from TV rights auction

Business
The Premier League has seen a decline in the money raised from the sale of rights to broadcast matches in the UK.In total BT and Sky bid £4.4bn to screen the lion's share of 200 games for each season between 2019-2022.That amount falls short of the £5.1bn the Premier League netted in 2015.Two packages to show 20 midweek matches are still to be sold, but experts say it is unlikely they will raise enough to top the previous rights deal."I don't think that those two packages by themselves are going to bridge the gap between what the domestic rights were sold for last time and what they're going for this time," said Dan Jones, head of the sports business group at the accountancy firm Deloitte.In 2012, BT and Sky paid £3bn for the rights to show matches between 2013 and 2015, up from £1.77bn in
Freelancers to get more employment rights

Freelancers to get more employment rights

Business
Millions of people workers in the so-called gig economy are to be given sick and holiday pay from day one, under Government plans to modernise workers' rights.The Department for Business has responded to the Matthew Taylor review, published last summer, which called for all work to be properly rewarded.The plans include enforcing workers' holidays and sick pay for the first time and introducing the right for all workers to request a more stable contract to provide more financial security.The gig economy describes the trend for companies to hire freelancers instead of full-time employees with people being paid for each "gig" they do.Business Secretary Greg Clark said: "The Taylor Review said that the current approach to employment is successful but that we should build on that success, in p...
Report: Pentagon skirted U.S. law on human rights abuses in Afghanistan

Report: Pentagon skirted U.S. law on human rights abuses in Afghanistan

Business
Jan. 23 (UPI) -- The U.S. agency overseeing Afghanistan reconstruction said in a report Tuesday that the State and Defense Departments skirted U.S. human rights laws by financially backing Afghan security forces accused of abuses.The report from the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction said that both departments sidestepped Leahy Laws, continuing funding despite credible allegations of "gross violations of human rights," including child rape.Leahy Laws prohibit the agencies from providing financial support and military assistance to foreign security forces that violate human rights with impunity.According to the report, the Pentagon used an exception meant for security and continued to provide "select training, equipment, and other assistance to some of the Afghan units...
Report: More than 300 human rights activists killed in 2017

Report: More than 300 human rights activists killed in 2017

World
Jan. 5 (UPI) -- At least 312 human rights activists were killed in 27 countries during 2017, according to the Front Line Defenders' annual report."More than two-thirds of these, 67 percent of the total number of activists killed, were defending land, environmental and indigenous peoples' rights, nearly always in the context of mega projects, extractive industry and big business," FLD said in their Human Rights Defenders At Risk report.FLD said there were few repercussions for killing human rights activists and many of them were predictable. Only 12 percent of reported deaths resulted in an arrest and 84 percent of victims received at least one targeted death threat."Around the world, defenders continue to tell us that police and government officials refuse to respond to requests for protec...
Uber loses appeal over workers' rights ruling

Uber loses appeal over workers' rights ruling

Business
Uber has lost an appeal against a landmark ruling on the employment rights of its drivers.Two drivers, James Farrar and Yaseen Aslam, won a case against the ride-hailing app last year after arguing they were workers and entitled to the minimum wage, sick pay, paid holiday and breaks.During its failed attempt to overturn the decision at the Employment Appeal Tribunal in London, Uber claimed the ruling could deprive drivers of the "personal flexibility they value".The company, which is also battling Transport for London over its licence to operatein the capital, said it would appeal against Friday's judgment.In a statement, it said: "Almost all taxi and private hire drivers have been self-employed for decades, long before our app existed.Image:The tech firm claims its drivers are 'partners' ...