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Tag: rising

Global warming linked with rising antibiotic resistance

Global warming linked with rising antibiotic resistance

Science
May 21 (UPI) -- New research suggests rising temperatures are encouraging antibiotic resistance in cities across the United States. Until now, health researchers assumed antibiotic resistance was primarily the result of overprescription and overuse. But a new study suggests climate change is also to blame. "The effects of climate are increasingly being recognized in a variety of infectious diseases, but so far as we know this is the first time it has been implicated in the distribution of antibiotic resistance over geographies," Derek MacFadden, an infectious disease specialist and research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital, said in a news release. "We also found a signal that the associations between antibiotic resistance and temperature could be increasing over time." MacFadden and ...
Pain at the pump: Gas prices hit three-year high and are expected to keep rising

Pain at the pump: Gas prices hit three-year high and are expected to keep rising

Finance
Buckle up, America. Gas prices have a hit a level not seen in three years and are expected to continue their upward trajectory.The national average for a gallon of gas reached $ 2.82 this week, a level not seen since summer 2015, according to online gas station database GasBuddy.com.Californians are paying the most: $ 3.61 per gallon. By contrast, Oklahoma has the lowest state average, at about $ 2.50.While gas prices typically head higher every spring due to increased driving demand, the current average is 48 cents more per gallon — an increase of about 20.5 percent — than the $ 2.34 consumers paid a year ago before prices inched downward. For most of summer 2017, the average price hovered around $ 2.30 or trended lower.The summer months will likely bring even higher prices."While it won'
Rising levels of 'frustration' at UN climate stalemate

Rising levels of 'frustration' at UN climate stalemate

Science
Old divisions between rich and poor over money and ambition are again threatening to limit progress in UN climate negotiations.Discussions between negotiators from nearly 200 countries have resumed in Germany, aiming to flesh out the rules on the Paris climate pact.But developing countries say they are "frustrated" with the lack of leadership from the developed world.Commitments to cut carbon are still "woefully inadequate" they said. 2018 marks a critical stage in the global climate negotiations process. By the end of this year, governments will meet in Poland to finalise the so-called "rulebook" of the Paris deal, agreed in the French capital in December 2015.This is seen as a key test. The rules will define the ways in which every country reports on their emissions and on their carbon-...
Rising temperatures enabled peatland formation at the end of the last ice age

Rising temperatures enabled peatland formation at the end of the last ice age

Science
April 16 (UPI) -- New research suggests periods of global warming during the last ice age encouraged the formation of peatlands.Researchers began by designing a computer model to simulate local climate patterns during the last 26,000 years. The last ice age reached its glacial maximum between 26,000 and 22,000 years ago, after which glaciers began to retreat.Scientists also created a timeline of peatland formation using radiocarbon dating peat samples collected in North America, northern Europe and Patagonia. When they compared their timeline with their model's simulations, they found higher local summer temperatures, not increased rainfall, accurately predicted peatland formation."This work helps explain the genesis of one of the world's most important ecosystem types and its potentially ...
Temperatures to keep rising in Pacific Northwest, new climate models confirm

Temperatures to keep rising in Pacific Northwest, new climate models confirm

Science
Feb. 23 (UPI) -- No region will be immune to climate change, and new research suggests the Pacific Northwest is no exception.To better predict how climate change will impact the northwest corner of the United States, scientists at Oregon State University and the U.S. Forest Service localized the predictions of 30 "general circulation" climate models.General circulation models produce outputs at scales too large to be applied to small-scale systems, like a regional watershed. But scientists were able to localize the large-scale predictions using a process called "downscaling."During the downscaling process, researchers populated the combined models with weather and atmospheric data collected at research stations throughout the Northwest.Though the predictions feature variability depending o...