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Tag: risk

Natural world at severe risk, Attenborough tells Prince William

Natural world at severe risk, Attenborough tells Prince William

Technology
Sir David Attenborough warned of the "echoes and implications" in the natural world of everything humans do in the urban world as he took questions from old friend Prince William. In front of a packed audience at the World Economic Forum in Davos, the Duke of Cambridge spoke to the 92-year-old broadcaster and naturalist for half an hour, talking about their shared passions for conservation, tackling climate change and Sir David's long broadcasting career.After William asked what advice Sir David would give to people of his age, the broadcaster said: "We have to recognise that every breath of air we take, every mouthful of food that we take comes from the natural world, and that if we damage the natural world we damage ourselves."We are one coherent eco-system, it's not just...
New screening could accurately predict type 1 diabetes risk in babies

New screening could accurately predict type 1 diabetes risk in babies

Health
Jan. 17 (UPI) -- A new screening may forecast type 1 diabetes risk in babies, a new study says. The new risk score known as the T1DGRS2 showed twice the efficiency as existing tests in predicting the chance of babies developing Type 1 diabetes, new findings published Thursday in Diabetes Care. "Prediction of what diseases we might get in the future is an important area, and type 1 diabetes has a strong genetic element that we are now able to measure very well," Richard Oram, a researcher at University of Exeter, said in a press release. "Measurement of the type 1 diabetes genetic risk score could help predict who will develop the condition from early life could help with research into potential early life interventions, and with classifying diabetes correctly at diagnosis." Current type 1...
The Mediterranean diet can cut your risk of developing heart disease, study says

The Mediterranean diet can cut your risk of developing heart disease, study says

Health
This is a Kaiser Health News story. Once again, your mother was right. You really do need to eat your vegetables. And while you are at it, put down the bacon and pick up the olive oil, because new research supports the contention that switching to a Mediterranean diet could significantly decrease the risk of heart disease. According to a study published last month in JAMA Network Open, people who followed this type of diet had 25 percent less risk of developing cardiovascular disease over the course of 12 years. The diet’s components make sense to anyone who follows nutrition news. Avoid red meat in favor of “good” fats like fish and poultry. Swap out salt for herbs and spices. Ditch butter and margarine and opt for olive oil instead. Most important, eat a lot of fruits...
Report: College students at highest risk for developing meningitis B infection

Report: College students at highest risk for developing meningitis B infection

Health
Dec. 31 (UPI) -- College students have a higher risk of developing a rare and possibly deadly bacterial infection than non-college young people, according to a new study. Medical journal Pediatrics published a study Monday that found students between ages 18 and 24 are three and a half times likely to develop a meningococcus B, or MenB infection, which can cause a deadly blood disease. The researchers examined three years of meningococcal infection data from the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System, gathered from 2014 and 2016. A vaccine exists to combat Meningitis B, but it costs $ 300 and $ 400 for the two shots and isn't recommended as a vaccine for students entering college. "Although the incidence of MenB is low, it is a serious illness and parents should be aware that a...
Skipping breakfast even once a week might increase risk of diabetes

Skipping breakfast even once a week might increase risk of diabetes

Health
Many people consider breakfast to be the most important meal of the day, and perhaps that's for good reason. Skipping it might increase your type 2 diabetes risk, according to a new review of several studies. After looking at a total of six studies involving over 96,000 people — 5,000 of whom had already been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes — German researchers found that skipping breakfast for just one day of the week was associated with a 6 percent higher risk of developing diabetes. However, the risk went up with each additional day, peaking at a 55 percent higher risk of diabetes after skipping breakfast for four to five days each week. Breakfast is meant to “break the fast” after a night of sleep, registered dietitian Dalina Soto told ABC News. When you eat b...