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Tag: Rivers

Climate signature detected in Earth’s rivers

Climate signature detected in Earth’s rivers

Science
Sept. 16 (UPI) -- Scientists have found a climate signature in the planet's rivers. Climate dictates many of Earth's geologic and hydrological systems, but scientists have struggled to pinpoint the influence of climate on the formation of rivers. Now, researchers have uncovered evidence suggesting climate controls the elevational profile of rivers across the globe. An elevational profile, or long profile, is formed by tracing a river from its headwaters to its mouth. Most rivers fall steeply from the uplands before flattening in the lowlands. The pattern produces a concave up shape. Less common is a straight long profile, which if formed by a river that descends evenly in elevation, like a ramp from mountain to sea. The latest analysis suggests the long profiles of rivers in humid region...
As planet warms, Arctic lakes, rivers will lose their biodiversity

As planet warms, Arctic lakes, rivers will lose their biodiversity

Science
May 22 (UPI) -- As Earth's temperatures continue to rise, freshwater ecosystems in the Arctic are becoming unusually warm -- too warm for many native species. According to a report, the trend could cause regional extinctions, resulting in a tremendous loss of biodiversity in Arctic lakes and rivers. The recently published Arctic Freshwater Biodiversity Report, a product of the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program, CBMP, suggests Arctic species are running out of Arctic habitat. "The findings of the report are alarming. Global warming is reducing the area of the region that can be considered as Arctic," Danny Chun Pong Lau, an ecologist at UmeƄ University in Sweden, said in a news release. "The consequence is that southern species move northwards and cold tolerant species face poss
Thawing permafrost leaves traceable carbon footprint in Arctic rivers

Thawing permafrost leaves traceable carbon footprint in Arctic rivers

Science
May 7 (UPI) -- Researchers have found a way to measure the carbon released into Arctic rivers by thawing permafrost. Carbon is everywhere. It is also often on the move. But some carbon sources are sneakier than others. To better understand the planet's carbon budget and its influence on climate change, scientists must develop ways to more accurately track some of this sneaky carbon. When permafrost thaws, ancient carbon, sometimes frozen for hundreds of thousands of years, is freed up. As the planet continues to warm, more and more of this frozen carbon is escaping. But measuring this climate-carbon feedback is difficult. To better track the phenomena, scientists at Stockholm University decided to measure the radiocarbon signal of runaway carbon in large rivers. "Rivers transport carbon ...
Rivers can cause earthquakes, geologists claim

Rivers can cause earthquakes, geologists claim

Science
Dec. 21 (UPI) -- New research suggests river erosions can explain the pattern of earthquakes faraway from plate boundaries, like the 4.4 magnitude quake that shook Eastern Tennessee last week. Geologists Ryan Thigpen and Sean Gallen designed a model to simulate how the removal of 500 feet of rock influences crust behavior in the Tennessee Valley. The model's results match the pattern of earthquakes in the region over the last century. "We're taught in introductory geology that the vast majority of earthquakes occur at plate tectonic boundaries, such as in Japan and along the San Andreas fault zone," Thigpen, an assistant professor at the University of Kentucky, said in a news release. But the traditional earthquake mechanisms can't explain the rumbles among seismic zones of East Tennessee...