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Flares, grenades and tear gas thrown as Rome’s anti-lockdown protests continue

Flares, grenades and tear gas thrown as Rome’s anti-lockdown protests continue

World
Violence broke out in Rome as anti-lockdown protesters threw flares and flash grenades at police, who fought back with tear gas and water cannons.Supporters of the far-right party Forza Nuova (New Force) were largely among the crowd of a few hundred in Piazza del Popolo, one of Rome's famous landmarks. They were protesting against new COVID-19 restrictions, including a 6pm curfew for bars and restaurants and the closure of public gyms, cinemas and swimming pools. Image: Far right demonstrators clashed with police during the protest Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announced the measures on Sunday to try to slow a second wave of infections.Scuffles broke out when the protesters, who were shouting "freedom, freedom," lit coloured ...
Alaskan volcano eruption triggered Rome’s transition from republic to empire

Alaskan volcano eruption triggered Rome’s transition from republic to empire

Science
June 23 (UPI) -- Ancient ice cores suggest a giant volcanic eruption in what's now Alaska set off a series of climatic shocks that sowed economic disruption and political upheaval across the Mediterranean during the middle of the 1st century B.C. In the wake of the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., Rome's power brokers jockeyed for control as the Roman Republic disintegrated and the Roman Empire emerged. Several hundred miles to the Southeast, Cleopatra's attempt to restore Egypt to its former glory was complicated by failed floods, famine and disease. Advertisement To better understand how ancient climate change influenced the trajectory of this turbulent period of history, researchers analyzed paleoclimatic, archaeological and historical records. When scientists compared their ...
Romulus mystery: Experts divided on ‘tomb of Rome’s founding father’

Romulus mystery: Experts divided on ‘tomb of Rome’s founding father’

Science
A sarcophagus discovered in the remains of an ancient temple in Rome is causing a stir among historians who cannot agree if it belongs to the Italian city's legendary founder, Romulus. The stone tomb, along with circular altar, dates from the 6th Century BC. According to legend, Romulus founded the city on Palatine Hill in 753 BC after killing his twin brother Remus.But experts are divided over whether the empty tomb can be linked to Romulus - or if the brothers even existed.The discovery was unveiled by Italian archaeologists at the Roman Forum on Friday. Historians said that while the find in the heart of the city was significant, it represented a symbolic rather than a real grave.They argue that even if Romulus had existed, th...