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Court rules startup may collect data from LinkedIn profiles

Technology
A federal appeals court has affirmed the right of a startup company to collect information from people's public profiles on networking service LinkedIn. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in San Francisco upheld a previous ruling Monday siding with hiQ Labs, a San Francisco company that analyzes workforce data scraped from profiles. LinkedIn invoked a federal anti-hacking law in telling hiQ to stop. It also installed technical blocks to prevent hiQ from accessing otherwise publicly available information on LinkedIn users. A 2017 ruling ordered LinkedIn to stop blocking the startup. LinkedIn appealed. LinkedIn, which is owned by Microsoft Corp., said it is disappointed in the decision and evaluating options for an appeal. HiQ did not immediately respond for a message for comme...
Police use of facial recognition is legal, High Court rules

Police use of facial recognition is legal, High Court rules

Technology
The High Court has ruled it is legal for police to use facial recognition technology after a crowdfunded challenge against the practice.Ed Bridges, 36, brought a case against South Wales Police after claiming the force had caused him "distress" and violated his privacy and data protection rights by processing an image taken of him in public. He said his face was scanned while out Christmas shopping in 2017 and again at a peaceful anti-arms protest in 2018, and was backed by the human rights group Liberty in a first-of-its-kind legal challenge. Image: Ed Bridges' image was captured in Cardiff But the case has been dismissed by the High Court, which ruled police had acted legally in its use of the tech - known in this instance as AFR Lo...
‘Beyond what was appropriate’: BBC rules on Jo Brand’s battery acid joke

‘Beyond what was appropriate’: BBC rules on Jo Brand’s battery acid joke

Entertainment
Jo Brand's controversial battery acid joke "went beyond what was appropriate" for a Radio 4 comedy show but did not incite violence, the BBC has ruled.The 62-year-old star made the jibe on an episode of Victoria Coren Mitchell's Radio 4 show Heresy in June. Referring to political figures who had been hit by milkshakes, Brand said: "I'm thinking why bother with a milkshake when you could get some battery acid."She added: "That's just me. I'm not going to do it, it's purely a fantasy, but I think milkshakes are pathetic, I honestly do, sorry." ...
Jo Brand battery acid joke ‘went too far’, BBC rules

Jo Brand battery acid joke ‘went too far’, BBC rules

Entertainment
Jo Brand's controversial joke about throwing battery acid "went beyond what was appropriate" for a Radio 4 comedy show, the BBC has ruled.The corporation has partially upheld complaints about the quip made by the comedian on Radio 4's Heresy in June.Referring to political figures who had been hit by milkshakes, she said: "I'm thinking, why bother with a milkshake when you could get some battery acid?"But the BBC dismissed complaints that her remark amounted to incitement.Following the broadcast, Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage, who had a milkshake thrown at him by protesters several weeks earlier, accused Brand of "inciting violence". The corporation's Editorial Complai...
Trump cannot block his critics on Twitter, court rules

Trump cannot block his critics on Twitter, court rules

Technology
US President Donald Trump is not allowed to block critics on Twitter because he dislikes their views, a federal court has ruled.A panel of three judges in Manhattan said the president was forbidden from limiting access to his feed under the first amendment of the US Constitution. The legal challenge was brought by the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University and seven people blocked by Mr Trump after criticising his policies. Image: Mr Trump regularly uses Twitter to attack his critics In the court's ruling, circuit judge Barrington Parker wrote: "The first amendment does not permit a public official who utilises a social media account for all manner of official purposes to exclude persons from an otherwise-open online...