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The top 10 rules for gift-giving this holiday season

The top 10 rules for gift-giving this holiday season

Finance
Caiaimage/Paul Bradbury | Caiaimage | Getty ImagesYou've got your holiday shopping list made and you're checking it twice.But are you getting the right gifts for the right people? And what should you do if you are strapped for cash?Following some simple gift-giving rules can help you easily navigate the holiday season. They can also help set the tone for your relationships for the upcoming year, said etiquette expert Elaine Swann."It's important to follow some of these guidelines to help you lay a strong foundation that will aid you in strengthening and enhancing your relationship moving forward," she said.Your shopping list may include family, close friends and co-workers."Holiday gifts are given to those we want to show our appreciation to," said Myka Meier, founder and director of Beaum...
US proposes rules to vet all telecoms-related purchases

US proposes rules to vet all telecoms-related purchases

Technology
The Department of Commerce has proposed requiring case-by-case approvals of all transactions related to telecommunications in a move seen likely to affect Chinese suppliers like HuaweiBy ELAINE KURTENBACH AP Business WriterNovember 27, 2019, 9:47 AM4 min read The Department of Commerce has proposed requiring case-by-case approvals of all purchases of telecommunications equipment in a move likely to hit major Chinese suppliers like Huawei. The proposal issued Tuesday follows President Donald Trump’s order in May declaring a national emergency and restricting purchases by U.S. companies of telecoms equipment that might be considered a security threat. That order did not name specific countries or companies but was thought to target Chinese suppliers such as Huawei Technologies and ZTE Corp.
Tories outline migration rules as Labour shelve free movement plans

Tories outline migration rules as Labour shelve free movement plans

Business
The Conservatives have pledged to cut immigration "overall", with the "vast majority" of migrants to be required to have a job offer to come to the UK - regardless of where they are from.High-skilled scientists and those who want to start a business will be among a small number of exceptions. Access to benefits will be equalised between EU nationals and those from elsewhere, meaning a typical wait of five years for non-UK citizens, and benefits will no longer be sent abroad to support children outside the UK.Ministers have already made clear they are finally abandoning the party's long-standing commitment to get net migration down below 100,000 a year - a target they have never met.The party said the new measures would save around £800m a year by 2024-2025.
Next government ‘set to break spending rules’

Next government ‘set to break spending rules’

Business
High borrowing means the next government is set to bust rules on spending, the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) has said.The gap between what the government spends and what it receives was now set to be much higher than expected, the think tank warned.Higher public spending, slower growth and changes to the way student loans are counted have pushed up borrowing.Years of rising debt risked burdening "future generations", the IFS said.IFS director Paul Johnson said it left little room for election giveaways if the parties wanted to keep within the current spending rules.UK borrowing up by a fifth over past six months"At some point it becomes unsustainable, you've got to stop it going up at some point especially when you know big spending pressures are com...
Facebook chief rules out banning political adverts

Facebook chief rules out banning political adverts

Technology
Facebook's founder Mark Zuckerberg has said he does not think it is right for a company to censor politicians or the news in a democracy.He was giving a speech in Washington DC following weeks of criticism over the firm's decision not to ban political adverts that contain falsehoods.He added he had considered barring all political ads on his platforms.But he said he believed the move would favour incumbent politicians and whoever the media chose to cover.And Mr Zuckerberg said that even if he had supported the idea, it was not clear where his firm would draw the line.Instead, he said, he had decided the company should "err on the side of greater expression"."We're at another crossroads," he said."We can either continue to stand f...