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Amazon forced to pull products in India as new rules bite

Amazon forced to pull products in India as new rules bite

Technology
Amazon has been forced to remove an array of products from its website in India to comply with new regulations. The rules prevent online retailers from selling products through vendors in which they hold an equity stake. The regulations are expected to have a far-reaching impact on India's e-commerce sector, which has drawn billions in foreign investment.Amazon and Flipkart lobbied against the laws which aim to protect small businesses. The changes to foreign direct investment rules, which come into force 1 February, also stop online retailers from making deals to sell exclusively on their platforms. Small retailers in India have long pushed for tougher competition rules, arguing the major players have an unfair advantage.But Amazon and Walmart, which own...
Obscene porn rules relaxed in England and Wales

Obscene porn rules relaxed in England and Wales

Technology
Guidelines about what constitutes "obscene" pornography have been relaxed in England and Wales.The Crown Prosecution Service had previously listed torture and bondage, among other acts, as obscene.Distributing that type of pornography either on or offline could therefore have led to a prosecution.But the CPS has now removed the list and replaced it with series of "tests" that determine whether an image or video is classed as obscene.What has changed?Owning or distributing an "obscene" video is an offence under the Obscene Publications Act. Some of the acts previously listed by the CPS were legal to perform with a consenting adult, but were illegal to depict in photos or videos."Distributing" obscene material can simply mean sending a video via private mes...
UK film age rating rules get stricter for scenes of sexual violence

UK film age rating rules get stricter for scenes of sexual violence

Entertainment
Under-15s will no longer be able to go to see films that depict rape and other sexual violence under new rules set by Britain's film ratings body.The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) surveyed more than 10,000 people and found it to be among parents' main concerns.Any film showing sexual violence will now get at least a 15 rating rather than a 12 or a 12A.The BBFC also wants its ratings to appear on all streaming services.BBFC chief executive David Austin said a film like Keira Knightley's 2008 drama The Duchess, which was classed as a 12 at the time, would be made a 15 today because it included a rape scene."What parents told us was, that's too much for 12-year-olds," he told BBC News. "It's enough that a 12-year-old k...
RBI issues consumer protection rules for mobile wallets: Users liability limited

RBI issues consumer protection rules for mobile wallets: Users liability limited

Finance
The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) has issued the guidelines limiting consumers' liability in case of unauthorised transactions that have taken place from their mobile wallets. As per the guidelines, Prepaid Payment Instrument (PPI) issuers will be required to provide a contact number and/or email ID in the transaction alert SMS through which consumers can report the unauthorised transactions or notify objections. If an unauthorised transaction takes place from the customer's mobile wallet due to the negligence of PPI issuer, then in that case the customer's liability will be ZERO, as per these new guidelines.As per the guidelines issued by RBI in a circular dated January 4, 2019, Prepaid Payment Instrument (PPI) issuers such as Paytm, Amazon Pay, PhonePe and so on must ensure that their cust...
Top EU court rules UK can change mind over Brexit

Top EU court rules UK can change mind over Brexit

World
The European Union's top court ruled Monday that Britain can change its mind over Brexit, boosting the hopes of people who want to stay in the EU that the process can be reversed. The European Court of Justice ruled that when an EU member country has notified its intent to leave, "that member state is free to revoke unilaterally that notification." Britain voted in 2016 to leave the 28-nation bloc, and invoked Article 50 of the EU's Lisbon Treaty in March 2017, triggering a two-year exit process. Article 50 contains few details, in part because the idea of any country leaving was considered unlikely. A group of Scottish legislators had asked the ECJ to rule on whether the U.K. can pull out of the withdrawal procedure on its own. The Luxembourg-based ECJ said that given the absence of any...