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Tag: salmon

Study reveals dramatic loss of genetic diversity among Columbia River Chinook salmon

Study reveals dramatic loss of genetic diversity among Columbia River Chinook salmon

Science
Jan. 10 (UPI) -- Genetic diversity helps species survive and adapt to changing environmental conditions. Unfortunately for the Columbia River Chinook salmon, the species has lost nearly two-thirds of its genetic diversity.Scientists at Washington State University collected and analyzed DNA samples from salmon found in the Snake and Columbia rivers. They compared their genome to DNA samples from salmon bones dating to 7,000 years ago.The results -- published this week in the journal PLOS One -- show the salmon has experienced a dramatic decline in genetic diversity.Researchers aren't sure what's driving the decline but believe the arrival of European settlers in the 1800s played a significant role."The big question is: Is it the dams or was it this huge fishing pressure when Europeans arriv...
The Best Salmon Toppings You Haven’t Tried Yet

The Best Salmon Toppings You Haven’t Tried Yet

Health
Here are three delicious, creative ways to flavor your salmon fillets. Are you bored with your same-old, basic salmon recipes? Try one of these easy, healthy ways to add serious flavor to your fish dinners fast. For each version below, start with four 5-oz. skin-on salmon fillets, and bake them on a foil-lined baking sheet at 425 degrees.Gergg Dupress; Prop Styling: Thom Driver; Food Styling: Chelsea ZimmerCider-Glazed Salmon Wasabi Crunch Salmon 1. Whisk together 3/4 cup cider and 1 Tbsp. honey in a pan; bring to a boil. Boil, stirring, until reduced to 3 Tbsp., about 10 minutes.2. Remove from heat; stir in 1 tsp. each chopped fresh rosemary and minced garlic. Place salmon, skin side down, on baking sheet; brush with 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard and sprinkle ...
Warm waters off West Coast has lingering effects for salmon

Warm waters off West Coast has lingering effects for salmon

Technology
The mass of warm water known as "the blob" that heated up the North Pacific Ocean has dissipated, but scientists are still seeing the lingering effects of those unusually warm sea surface temperatures on Pacific Northwest salmon and steelhead. Federal research surveys this summer caught among the lowest numbers of juvenile coho and Chinook salmon in 20 years, suggesting that many fish did not survive their first months at sea. Scientists warn that salmon fisheries may face hard times in the next few years. Fisheries managers also worry about below average runs of steelhead returning to the Columbia River now. Returns of adult steelhead that went to sea as juveniles a year ago so far rank among the lowest in 50 years. Scientists believe poor ocean conditions are likely to blame: Cold-water...