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Tag: Satellite

New US weather satellite can't keep cool, could hurt photos

New US weather satellite can't keep cool, could hurt photos

Technology
The nation's newest weather satellite, launched less than three months ago, has a serious cooling problem that could affect the quality of its pictures. The trouble is with the GOES-17 satellite's premier instrument for taking images of hurricanes, wildfires, volcanic eruptions and other natural calamities, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Wednesday. The imager's infrared sensors aren't getting properly cooled. Experts are scrambling to understand what went wrong and how to fix it. Officials expect it will take at least a few months to figure out. "As you can imagine, doing this remotely from 22,000 miles below only looking at the on-orbit data is a challenge," said Steve Volz, head of NOAA's satellite and information service. NOAA stresses that three other GOES s...
SpaceX's Block 5 launches, lands safely, delivers satellite into orbit

SpaceX's Block 5 launches, lands safely, delivers satellite into orbit

Science
May 11 (UPI) -- On the second launch attempt, SpaceX's Block 5 rocket, the final iteration of the Falcon 9, successfully blasted off on Friday. The updated rocket model, upgraded to enhance reusability, carried a Bangabandhu Satellite-1 into geostationary orbit. It will be the first Bangladeshi communications satellite put into space. The rocket launched right on time at 4:14 p.m. ET from Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. On Thursday, a last-minute abort alert forced SpaceX to abandon it's launch plans. The brief launch window didn't give engineers enough time to identify and correct the technical glitch. However, statements from SpaceX suggested the problem was with ground support systems, not the rocket itself. After launch, the mission achieved a quick successi...
NASA satellite spots northern lights from above

NASA satellite spots northern lights from above

Science
April 24 (UPI) -- On Tuesday, NASA's Earth Observatory shared an image of the aurora borealis, or northern lights, captured by the Suomi NPP satellite's VIIRS instrument.The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite's day-night band, or DNB sensor, is designed to observe a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared. The instrument and the satellite's software uses filtering techniques to isolate different sources of low light, including auroras, wildfires, city lights and even reflected moonlight.Over the weekend, VIIRS picked up the glow of the northern lights. The aurora was spotted swirling across northern Canada.When enough high-energy particles from the sun collide with Earth's magnetosphere, some of the particles already trapped in the magnetosphere get knocked into the upper a...
Satellite launched to harpoon 'dangerous' space junk

Satellite launched to harpoon 'dangerous' space junk

Technology
A mission demonstrating how to salvage potentially dangerous junk orbiting the Earth has been launched by a British-led consortium.The satellite, called RemoveDEBRIS, will be deployed from the International Space Station (ISS) and carries a net to capture space litter and a harpoon that is able to spear and haul in bigger objects.On Monday, a Space X 9 rocket carrying the box-like craft took off from the Kennedy Space Centre at Cape Canaveral, Florida.The RemoveDEBRIS is currently on board the capsule and is due to arrive at the ISS on Wednesday.A consortium led by the University of Surrey designed and built RemoveDEBRIS, which is funded by the European Commission and is the first practical attempt to try out clean-up technology.The launch came less than a day after Chinese space station T...
NASA satellite spots Eastern Europe's orange snow

NASA satellite spots Eastern Europe's orange snow

Science
March 27 (UPI) -- It looks like a giant creamsicle melted across the mountains of Russia, Bulgaria, Romania and Ukraine.As evidenced by new NASA images, shared online this week, waves of wind-blown Saharan dust have turned the snowy peaks of Eastern Europe orange.Over the last week, dust storms in North Africa have kicked Saharan sands into the air and carried them across the Mediterranean. As they're carried by the cross-continental winds, the dust mixes with rain and snow before being dropped on Eastern Europe.The phenomenon, which happens once every few years, has made for some stunning photography, both on the ground and from space.Images captured by NASA's Aqua satellite show the orange peaks from a vantage of 436 miles.Let's block ads! (Why?) Science News - UPI.com