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Tag: Science

In posthumous message, Hawking says science under threat

In posthumous message, Hawking says science under threat

Technology
Stephen Hawking spoke from beyond the grave Monday to warn the world that science and education are under threat around the world. The words of the scientist, who died in March at 76, were broadcast at a London launch event for his final book "Brief Answers To The Big Questions." Hawking warned that education and science are "in danger now more than ever before." He cited the election of U.S. President Donald Trump and Britain's 2016 vote to leave the European Union as part of "a global revolt against experts and that includes scientists." Acknowledging that science had yet to overcome major challenges for the world — including climate change, overpopulation, species extinction, deforestation and the degradation of the oceans — the physicist still urged young people "to look ...
Hawking's final science study released

Hawking's final science study released

Science
Stephen Hawking's final scientific paper has been released, and it deals with one of the central topics in the physicist's 56-year-long career.The work was completed in the days before Hawking's death in March.It tackles the question of whether black holes preserve information on the stuff that falls into them.Some researchers had believed this information was destroyed, but others said that this violated the laws of quantum mechanics.These laws propose that everything in our world can be broken down into information, for example, a string of 1s and 0s. In addition, this information should never disappear, not even if it gets sucked into a black hole.But Hawking, building on the work of Albert Einstein, showed that black holes ha...
The festivals mixing music and science

The festivals mixing music and science

Science
Music festivals are increasingly becoming a venue for science as well as bands. Are music and science a good mix?"It's changed my life," says Andrea Sella, who is professor of chemistry at University College London."I couldn't believe that I'd found myself at Latitude in front of about 1,000 people talking about carbon dioxide, dry ice and climate change," he says of his first involvement in scientific outreach at a music festival seven years ago."I thought, 'Oh my God, they started laughing. Let me remember what I did to cause it.'"It's changed the way I teach and speak to students. I've been able to take more risks. I've learnt enormous amounts about the craft of speaking in public." Prof Sella, who won the Royal Society Michael Faraday Prize in 2015 fo...
The Meg: the myth, the legend (the science)

The Meg: the myth, the legend (the science)

Science
The Meg, Hollywood's latest shark tale, is opening wide this week in anticipation of summer audiences in the mood for a scare.Proposing that the extinct Megalodon, a large prehistoric relative of the great white shark, has survived to the present day, the film follows its subsequent encounter with humanity.But how much do we really know about the giant predator?And what impact do shark attack films have on their real subjects?Shark researcher and Megalodon expert Catalina Pimiento from Swansea University wants to break down a few myths. Dead or alive?"It's very much extinct," says Dr Pimiento. "There's no way it can be still around."Researchers have pinned the date of Megalodon's extinction at ab...
Fastest manmade spinning object to aid quantum mechanics science

Fastest manmade spinning object to aid quantum mechanics science

Science
July 20 (UPI) -- The creators of the world's fastest manmade rotor believe their invention will boost the study of quantum mechanism, the branch of physic devoted to the behavior of subatomic particles. The new rotor can spin at a rate of 60 billion revolutions per minute. Most airplane turbines top out at 3,000 revolutions per minute. Scientists described their impressive new device this week in the journal Physical Review Letters. "This study has many applications, including material science," Tongcang Li, an assistant professor of physics and astronomy at Purdue University, said in a news release. "We can study the extreme conditions different materials can survive in." The rotor is composed of a tiny silica dumbbell. Scientists used a laser to levitate the dumbbell inside a vacuum. T...