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Tag: Scientists

Scientists have discovered a hidden talent of geckos

Scientists have discovered a hidden talent of geckos

Technology
This is an Inside Science story. The flat-tailed house gecko can not only stick to walls and glide through the air, but also run on water, a new study finds. This discovery of the combination of techniques the reptile uses to race across water could one day lead to robots capable of the same feats, researchers said. The flat-tailed house gecko (Hemidactylus platyurus) is a common pet reptile native to southern and Southeast Asia. Not only can bristles on its toes help it climb walls and hang from ceilings, but it can glide with the aid of its webbed feet and skin flaps. "They're kind of like superheroes -- every time you look at them, they can do more things," said study senior author Robert Full, an integrative biologist at the University of California, Berkeley. The newfound talent...
Largest ever black hole collision detected by scientists

Largest ever black hole collision detected by scientists

Technology
An international team of scientists have detected the largest ever black hole collision through the ripples it made in space-time. US scientists discovered the space-time ripples - officially known as gravitational waves - in a breakthrough in 2016, although their existence was predicted by Albert Einstein roughly a century ago.Now academics at the Australian National University (ANU) have detected the collision between two black holes, which are believed to have formed a new black hole about 80 times larger than the Sun.The ANU team worked in partnership with other academic institutions through the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), which is based in the US.ANU Professor Susan Scott said the team discovered four collisions in total by re-a...
Lancelets help scientists uncover the secrets of vertebrate gene regulation

Lancelets help scientists uncover the secrets of vertebrate gene regulation

Science
Nov. 21 (UPI) -- The research is clear, the physiological complexity that makes modern humans -- and other mammals -- unique from simpler species is a product of gene regulation, not genet quantity. But when and how did vertebrates and mammals evolve the kinds of gene regulatory mechanisms that made human complexity possible? New research -- published Wednesday in the journal Nature -- suggests lancelets, fish-like marine chordates, can provide an answer to the question. "If you really want to understand what makes vertebrates, mammals, humans special, you need to have this basis to compare them, evolutionarily," Ferdinand Marlétaz, a geneticist at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, said in a news release. New genomic analysis suggests organisms that emerged just aft...
Scientists turn Martian sunrise into a piece of music

Scientists turn Martian sunrise into a piece of music

Science
Nov. 12 (UPI) -- You can now listen to the sun rise on Mars. Scientists in England have translated the Martian sunrise into a two-minute score. Researchers used sonification techniques to translate image data into sounds, turning each pixel into a sonic data point. Using images of the 500th sunrise observed by the Mars rover Opportunity, scientists linked each pixel with brightness, color and elevation measurements. Special algorithms helped researchers turn the pixel data points into pitch and melody, forming a piece of music. The two-minute score will be shared with visitors to NASA's Mars Soundscapes exhibit on Tuesday at the Supercomputing SC18 Conference being held this week in Dallas, Texas. The song will be presented both sonically and vibrationally, so that it can be experienced b...
Rice scientists say nanotube film could make for better batteries

Rice scientists say nanotube film could make for better batteries

Science
Oct. 26 (UPI) -- The inclusion of films of carbon nanotubes could be key in building a longer-lasting battery, scientists at Rice University said. Led by chemist James Tour, the researchers used the nanotube films to come up with a way to halt the growth of dendrites on a battery's unprotected lithium metal anodes, Rice said in a news release Thursday. They published their results this month in the journal Advanced Materials. The dendrites usually degrade batteries by reaching their cathodes, prompting consumers to avoid lithium batteries in favor of their lithium-ion counterparts because developers can slow dendrite growth in lithium-ion batteries by slowing their charge time, Tour said. But Tour and his team determined that dendrite growth can be slowed in lithium batteries by using a s...