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Tag: Scientists

Scientists publish 3D-printing plans for 200-million-year-old dinosaur skull

Scientists publish 3D-printing plans for 200-million-year-old dinosaur skull

Science
Jan. 12 (UPI) -- Anyone with access to a 3D printer can now create a replica of a 200-million-year-old dinosaur skull.Scientists at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, used advanced CT scanning technology to image and digitally reconstruct -- bone by bone -- a detailed 3D model of the skull of Massospondylus, a sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic.The researchers published their rendering of the ancient dino skull this week in the journal PeerJ."This means any researcher or member of the public can print their own Massospondylus skull at home," Kimi Chapelle, a PhD student at the Evolutionary Studies Institute at Wits, said in a news release.Massospondylus is one of the most famous dinosaurs in South Africa. Its fossil record is rich. But the lates...
Data scientists mine government data for evidence of historical events

Data scientists mine government data for evidence of historical events

Science
Dec. 29 (UPI) -- Researchers have developed a way to mine electronic government records for evidence of significant historical events.For journalists and historians, sorting through government records is a tedious but important job. Though many government records aren't released until after a news event has come and gone, once published, the documents can shed new light historical happenings.Data scientists at Columbia University in New York have developed a way to more quickly and efficiently identify insightful and important government documents.Researchers tested their new data mining methodology on newly available classified records dated between 1973 and 1977. The records include 1.4 million declassified cables, as well as metadata related to 400,000 documents delivered via diplomatic...
Geminid meteor shower could be the year's best, scientists say

Geminid meteor shower could be the year's best, scientists say

Technology
Skywatchers are in for a dazzling show tonight. The annual Geminid meteor shower that will streak across the night sky will be one of the best of the year, scientists say. The Geminid meteors are expected to peak overnight. With good weather conditions, the cosmic display can be seen between 7:30 p.m. and dawn local time. The largest number of meteors will be visible between midnight and 4 a.m. local time, according to NASA. "With August's Perseids obscured by bright moonlight, the Geminids will be the best shower this year," said Bill Cooke with NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office. "The thin, waning crescent Moon won't spoil the show." Considered one of the year's most reliable meteor showers, the Geminids occur every December when Earth passes through a vast trail of dusty debris she...
Scientists revamp 'Out of Africa' model of early human migration

Scientists revamp 'Out of Africa' model of early human migration

Science
Dec. 8 (UPI) -- The "Out of Africa" model of early human migration and dispersal is outdated. As a new survey of research on the subject confirms, humans left Africa in waves, not in a single exodus.In the new survey, published this week in the journal Science, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Germany and the University of Hawai'i at Manoa detail early human evolution revelations reported from Asia over the last decade.Improved genetic analysis technology, fossil recognition abilities and an emphasis on interdisciplinary research has helped scientists confirm the presence of humans in various parts of Asia much earlier than previously thought.According to genetic analysis, humans moving into Eurasia interbred with hominins along the way, including...
Scientists discover Earth-size planet that could sustain life

Scientists discover Earth-size planet that could sustain life

Technology
A newly discovered Earth-size planet that could sustain life is poised to become Earth's closest stellar neighbor in a cosmic "blink of the eye," scientists at the European Southern Observatory announced in a press release today. Ross 128 b is an exoplanet 11 light-years from our solar system, but it is moving closer and is predicted to become Earth's closest stellar neighbor in 79,000 years, scientists said. It is currently the second-closest temperate planet to Earth, after Proxima b. Every 9.9 days, Ross 128 b orbits a red dwarf star known as Ross 128. Ross 128 is relatively quiet and cool and has just over half the surface temperature of the sun, scientists said, which could make Ross 128 b conducive to life. The star Ross 128 is part of the constellation of Virgo. "Many red dwarf ...