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Tag: Scientists

Scientists measure ocean currents underneath ‘Doomsday Glacier’

Scientists measure ocean currents underneath ‘Doomsday Glacier’

Science
April 9 (UPI) -- For the first time, climate scientists have measured ocean conditions beneath Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier, sometimes called the "Doomsday Glacier." The fresh observations, published Friday in the journal Science Advances, show Thwaites is exposed to larger amounts of warm water than previously estimated. Advertisement Thwaites is thought to be one of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet's most vulnerable glaciers, its location and structure making it especially susceptible to influxes of warm, salty water. In recent years, scientists have watched its grounding line recede and its height shrink as melting rates accelerate. To better understand the vulnerabilities of the glacier's underbelly, scientists sent a remote-controlled submersible named Ran beneath the ice shelf to inve...
Scientists use DNA technology to build tough 3D nanomaterials

Scientists use DNA technology to build tough 3D nanomaterials

Science
March 19 (UPI) -- Researchers at Columbia University have found a way to marry the versatility of DNA nanotechnology with the toughness of silica-based materials. DNA technology can be used to design self-assembling, complexly organized nanoparticle structures. Advertisement In theory, these structures can be designed for a variety of applications, but in reality, these structures are too soft and only stable in specific environs -- limiting their usefulness. Scientists described the novel fabrication process in a new paper, published Friday in the journal Science Advances. "A significant level of designability at nanoscale, through our assembly approach, combined with demonstrated robustness, opens opportunities to build targeted 3D nanomaterials from nanoparticles," Oleg Gang, professo...
Lab scientists grow mini human tear glands that cry

Lab scientists grow mini human tear glands that cry

Science
March 16 (UPI) -- Using new organoid technology, scientists have successfully grown miniature tear glands that actually cry. The breakthrough -- described Tuesday in the journal Cell Stem Cell -- could help researchers study the tear-production process and determine why some duct cells fail to produce tears. Advertisement Scientists hope the organic models can be used to develop treatments for tear gland disorders like dry eye disease. Eventually, tear glands grown in the lab could be used as transplants. Tears are vital to healthy eyes. Produced by the ducts in the corner of the eye socket, tears lubricate the eyes and deliver nutrition to the cornea. Antibacterial properties in tears also help prevent eye infections. "Dysfunction of the tear gland, for example in Sjögren's syndrome, ca...
Scientists unlock mysteries of world’s oldest ‘computer’

Scientists unlock mysteries of world’s oldest ‘computer’

Science
Prof Tony Freeth / UCLA 2,000-year-old device often referred to as the world's oldest "computer" has been recreated by scientists trying to understand how it worked.The Antikythera Mechanism has baffled experts since it was found on a Roman-era shipwreck in Greece in 1901.The hand-powered Ancient Greek device is thought to have been used to predict eclipses and other astronomical events.But only a third of the device survived, leaving researchers pondering how it worked and what it looked like.The back of the mechanism was solved by earlier studies, but the nature of its complex gearing system at the front has remained a mystery.Scientists from University College London (UCL) believe they have finally cracked the puzzle using 3D computer modelling. They have recreated the entire front pane...
‘Virus always has mutation as a weapon’: Scientists warn against lifting lockdown too soon

‘Virus always has mutation as a weapon’: Scientists warn against lifting lockdown too soon

Technology
Scientists tracking the spread of COVID variants have warned against lifting lockdown too soon.They caution that easing restrictions before daily cases are in "the low thousands" could allow more sinister versions of the virus to escape and seed a new outbreak. In an exclusive interview, Steve Paterson, professor of genetics at Liverpool University, told Sky News: "The virus doesn't care that we want to meet our friends. It's going to find new ways to transmit or evade immunity. Image: Professor Paterson said the virus 'has always got mutation and evolution as a weapon' "To give public health and the genome sequencing a chance to work out where the virus is mutating and where new variants are starting to spread, we really need that he...