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Tag: Scientists

Scientists use 3D climate model to narrow search for habitable exoplanets

Scientists use 3D climate model to narrow search for habitable exoplanets

Science
Nov. 14 (UPI) -- For the first time, scientists used a 3D climate model that incorporates photochemistry to study the habitability of exoplanets surrounding M dwarf stars. The findings -- published Thursday in the Astrophysical Journal -- could help planetary scientists know what to look for when surveying potentially habitable exoplanets. Researchers adopted a 3D climate model, originally developed by scientists at the University of Colorado-Boulder for the study of Earth's climate, to simulate the atmospheric dynamics of faraway planets -- specifically exoplanets orbiting M dwarf stars. These stars, also called red dwarfs, give off relatively small amounts light and heat. Originally, scientists thought M dwarfs were rare, and because they're relatively cool, scientists assumed planetar...
Scientists find seven new leech species that live inside freshwater mussels

Scientists find seven new leech species that live inside freshwater mussels

Science
Nov. 11 (UPI) -- If you eat freshwater mussels, you might open a shell to find one of seven newly named leech species. Yummy. Between 2002 and 2018, Arthur Bogan, research curator of mollusks at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, recruited collaborators from all over the globe to collect freshwater mussels, sample DNA and document what they found inside. The project revealed seven new species of leeches. According to Ivan N. Bolotov, scientist of the Federal Center for Integrated Arctic Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences and one of Bogan's collaborators, at least two of the species should be classified as obligate inhabitants of the freshwater mussel's mantle cavity. These species cannot complete their life cycle without their bivalve host. "It has been suggested tha...
Climate change: ‘Clear and unequivocal’ emergency, say scientists

Climate change: ‘Clear and unequivocal’ emergency, say scientists

Science
A global group of around 11,000 scientists have endorsed research that says the world is facing a climate emergency.The study, based on 40 years of data on a range of measures, says governments are failing to address the crisis.Without deep and lasting changes, the world is facing "untold human suffering" the study says.The researchers say they have a moral obligation to warn of the scale of the threat. Released on the day that satellite data shows that last month was the warmest October on record, the new study says that that simply measuring global surface temperatures is an inadequate way of capturing the real dangers of an overheating world. So the authors include a range of data which they believe represents a "suite of graphical vital signs of clima...
Cancer research: Scientists seek clues to how disease ‘is born’

Cancer research: Scientists seek clues to how disease ‘is born’

Health
British and American scientists are teaming up to search for the earliest signs of cancer in a bid to detect and treat the disease before it emerges.They plan to "give birth" to cancer in the lab to see exactly what it looks like "on day one".It is just one of the research priorities of the new International Alliance for Cancer Early Detection.Working together on early detection of cancer will mean patients benefitting more quickly, it says.Cancer Research UK has teamed up with the Universities of Cambridge, Manchester, University College London, and Stanford and Oregon in the US, to share ideas, technology and expertise in this area.Already thereTogether, the scientists are aiming to develop less invasive tests, such as blood, breath and urine tests, for...
Scientists find two new species of giant parasitic wasps in Uganda

Scientists find two new species of giant parasitic wasps in Uganda

Science
Oct. 9 (UPI) -- Finnish researchers conducting field studies in Africa have discovered two new species of giant parasitic wasps. The discovery, described this week in the journal ZooKeys, suggests the group of insects known as Afrotropical rhyssine wasps is more diverse than previously thought. The largest rhyssine wasp species can grow to lengths of 10 centimeters -- nearly 4 inches. The parasitic species lay their eggs inside the larvae of other wasps and beetles that harvest rotting wood. Until now, everything that scientists knew about the group of insects in the Afrotropical region was based on just 30 specimens. "A good example of how poorly tropical rhyssines are known is the species Epirhyssa overlaeti, which is the largest African rhyssine," lead researcher Tapani Hopkins, a do...