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Tag: Scientists

Scientists condemn professor's 'morally reprehensible' talk

Scientists condemn professor's 'morally reprehensible' talk

Science
More than 250 scientists have so far signed a statement condemning the remarks of the Italian researcher who stated that physics was "built by men".Prof Alessandro Strumia presented an analysis to an audience of predominantly young female physicists which he claimed "proved" women were less capable at the subject than men.The statement at particlesforjustice.org says Prof Strumia's talk was "fundamentally unsound" and was "followed by open discrimination and personal attacks".In response, Prof Strumia told BBC News that the high-energy physics community was about 100 times bigger than the number that have so far signed the statement.He said that the signatories "mostly come from those countries more affected by political correctn...
Data suggests scientists have found first known exomoon

Data suggests scientists have found first known exomoon

Science
Oct. 3 (UPI) -- The existence of a large exomoon orbiting a gas giant located 8,000 light-years form Earth best explains a unique pattern of stellar dimming observed by both Kepler and the Hubble Space Telescope. "We are unable to find any other single hypothesis that explains all the data that we have," astronomer David Kipping told reporters during a phone call earlier this week. Kipping and his colleague Alex Teachey, both researchers at Columbia University, detailed their investigation of the Hubble and Kepler data in a new paper published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances. The duo began their research by surveying 284 Kepler-discovered planets with long orbits. Planets too close to their host stars are less likely to feature moons. Of the 284 candidates, one stood out. The tr...
IPCC: Climate scientists consider 'life changing' report

IPCC: Climate scientists consider 'life changing' report

Science
It is likely to be the most critical and controversial report on climate change in recent years.Leading scientists are meeting in South Korea this week to see if global temperatures can be kept from rising by more than 1.5C this century.The world has already passed one degree of warming as carbon emissions have ballooned since the 1850s.Many low-lying countries say they may disappear under the sea if the 1.5C limit is breached.After a week of deliberations in the city of Incheon, the researchers' new report is likely to say that keeping below this limit will require urgent and dramatic action from governments and individuals alike.One scientist told BBC News that our lives would never be the same if the world changed course to st...
Underwater matchmaking: Scientists pair zebrafish mates by personality

Underwater matchmaking: Scientists pair zebrafish mates by personality

Science
Sept. 21 (UPI) -- For zebrafish mates, the proper pairing of personalities is the best way to ensure reproductive success. Scientists know both behaviors and appearance influence mate selection, but deciphering which factors are most important is difficult. To better understand the sexual selection process, scientists tested the reproductive success of fish paired by both personality and appearance. "Our research explored both areas -- coloration patterns and personality traits -- to see if they were linked in some way and how they impacted the fitness of the species," Rey Planellas, a researcher at the University of Stirling, said in a news release. To conduct their matchmaking experiments, scientists selected male and female zebrafish for four different combinations of personality and a...
Bye bye bugs? Scientists fear non-pest insects are declining

Bye bye bugs? Scientists fear non-pest insects are declining

Technology
A staple of summer — swarms of bugs — seems to be a thing of the past. And that's got scientists worried. Pesky mosquitoes, disease-carrying ticks, crop-munching aphids and cockroaches are doing just fine. But the more beneficial flying insects of summer — native bees, moths, butterflies, ladybugs, lovebugs, mayflies and fireflies — appear to be less abundant. Scientists think something is amiss, but they can't be certain: In the past, they didn't systematically count the population of flying insects, so they can't make a proper comparison to today. Nevertheless, they're pretty sure across the globe there are fewer insects that are crucial to as much as 80 percent of what we eat. Yes, some insects are pests. But they also pollinate plants, are a key link in the fo...