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Tag: Secondhand

Finland: Where second-hand comes first

Finland: Where second-hand comes first

Science
With her daughter and baby son, Kati Rossi is prowling a suburb of Helsinki in the hunt for a second-hand bookshelf.Across the road looms a Swedish furniture giant, but Kati is scouring a huge municipal re-use centre instead. “I don’t want to go to IKEA,” she tells me. "I will find something much more interesting here, and much more original. “I don’t want to have the same furniture as everyone else. What I buy here will be a fraction of the price and better for the planet.”As concern grows about the resources we’re using and the CO2 that is producing our goods, does this place hold lessons for the world?It is one of a network of giant non-profit re-use stores in Finland. Not the regular...
Secondhand smoke poses greater risks for teens: Study

Secondhand smoke poses greater risks for teens: Study

Health
More than 1.1 billion adults worldwide smoke cigarettes and, though laws that limit public and workplace smoking are lessening the amount of exposure to the public, an estimated 9.6 million U.S. adolescents are exposed to tobacco smoke, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Since the 1960s, researchers have been looking at the health effects of secondhand smoking and have linked this exposure with an increased likelihood of getting ear infections, lung infections and even contributing to poor lung development in small children. Additional research has demonstrated secondhand smoke exposure in children both increases the likelihood of suffering from asthma and worsens the severity of it in children afflicted by this condition. Researchers from the University of...
Second-hand toys could harm children, scientists discover

Second-hand toys could harm children, scientists discover

Health
Plastic used in some second-hand toys could pose a health risk for children as they don't meet the most up-to-date safety guidelines, a study has found. Scientists tested 200 used plastic toys they found in nurseries, thrift shops and homes across England's south-west for nine hazardous elements.Twenty toys had traces of all nine elements, with some concentrations high enough to fail European standards. But experts said it would be difficult to quantify the risk. "Lego bricks from the 70s and 80s are the big fail," said Dr Andrew Turner, of the University of Plymouth, who conducted the study. "Toys in those days weren't tested and now we're using them and handing them down." Chronically toxicFor the study, published in Environmental Science and Technology, Dr Turner and his team used X-ray...