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Tag: Seismic

Seismic forensics could inform a warning system for future floods

Seismic forensics could inform a warning system for future floods

Science
Sept. 30 (UPI) -- Seismic forensics could help scientists develop an early warning system for rockslides and floods in the future. On Feb. 7, 2021, a large rockslide trigged a deadly flood in India's Dhauli Ganga Valley. The rush of water killed more than 200 people and destroyed a pair of hydroelectric power plants. In a new study, published Thursday in the journal Science, researchers used data from a network of seismometers to piece together the minute-by-minute seismic signatures of the rockslide and subsequent flood. Although scientists have yet to determine what exactly triggered the catastrophe, they know that just after 10:20 in the morning, local time, 20 million cubic meters of ice and rock plunged down the slopes Ronti Peak, a mountain glacier, and into the Ronti Ga...
What you need to know about the meteor that caused seismic shock over Michigan

What you need to know about the meteor that caused seismic shock over Michigan

Technology
The meteor that lit up the night sky over southeast Michigan and shook the ground Tuesday night did not actually cause an earthquake, researchers say. In fact, meteors do not cause earthquakes to rupture along a fault, according to William Yeck, a research geophysicist at the United States Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colorado. The seismic observations associated with the meteor were assigned a magnitude 2.0 by the United States Geological Survey, which said the event was centered about 5 miles west-southwest of New Haven, Michigan, some 40 miles northeast of Detroit. The National Weather Service sent out a tweet that said, "USGS confirms meteor occurred around 810 pm, causing a magnitude 2.0 earthquake." But Yeck said the magnitude cannot be di...
Warm rock rising deep beneath New England, seismic study reveals

Warm rock rising deep beneath New England, seismic study reveals

Science
Dec. 1 (UPI) -- Deep beneath New England, a giant mass of warm rock is slowly but steadily rising toward the surface. The revelation undermines some of what scientists thought they understand about plate tectonics and the geology of the mantle."The upwelling we detected is like a hot air balloon, and we infer that something is rising up through the deeper part of our planet under New England," researcher Vadim Levin, a geophysicist and professor at Rutgers University-New Brunswick, said in a news release.The mass of rock is not on the scale of Yellowstone. It measures a couple hundred miles across, and though it may one day form a new volcanic system, it is unlikely to yield an eruption for millions of years.Scientists were first alerted to something peculiar after noticing a temperature a...
Seismic events strike shale-rich Oklahoma for second day

Seismic events strike shale-rich Oklahoma for second day

Business
Aug. 4 (UPI) -- The U.S Geological Survey recorded a cluster of tremors early Friday in a part of Oklahoma on a watch list for activity related to shale oil and gas operations.Four tremors were reported as of 5:45 a.m. EDT by the USGS, the largest of which was a magnitude-3.3 event about three miles outside the town of Edmond. At least eight quakes were recorded Thursday, with Edmond experiencing a magnitude-4.2 event.One of the U.S. states with a significant amount of shale oil and natural gas, a study from the USGS found the disposal of oil and gas-related wastewater is the "primary reason" for an increase in seismic activity in central states like Oklahoma. That process is different from hydraulic fracturing.State orders related to an area of interest near Edmond translate to a volume r...
Seismic surveys responsible for high zooplankton mortality rates

Seismic surveys responsible for high zooplankton mortality rates

Science
June 23 (UPI) -- Seismic surveys carried out by the oil and gas industry are causing high mortality rates among zooplankton, according to new research out of Australia.Seismic air guns are frequently used on marine petroleum expeditions. New research found the air blasts dramatically increase mortality rates among target zooplankton species. Testing also showed the air gun's negative impact extends well beyond previous range estimates.Testing revealed air gun pulses yielded between an 18 and 60 percent increase in zooplankton mortality rates. The seismic blasts also killed al zooplankton larva. These effects extended across nearly 4,000 feet. It was previously believed the negative impact of seismic air guns was limited to roughly 30 feet.The findings -- detailed in a study published Thurs...