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Tag: sensor

Boeing jet crashed in Indonesia after key sensor replaced

Boeing jet crashed in Indonesia after key sensor replaced

World
A crucial sensor was replaced on a Lion Air jet the day before it plunged into the Java Sea, and that sensor replacement may have exacerbated other problems with the plane, Indonesian investigators said Wednesday. That sensor, known as the "angle of attack" sensor, keeps track of the angle of the aircraft nose to help prevent the plane from stalling and diving. Earlier this week, Indonesian officials hinted that airspeed indicators played a role in the deadly Oct. 29 crash that killed all 189 people on board. The jet's airspeed indicator malfunctioned on its last four flights, and that problem was related to the sensor issue, said Soerjanto Tjahjono, chairman of Indonesia's National Transportation Safety Committee, on Wednesday. Lion Air's first two attempts to address the airspeed indic...
Boeing tapped for Navy sensor upgrades

Boeing tapped for Navy sensor upgrades

Business
April 20 (UPI) -- The U.S. Navy awarded Boeing a contract for upgrades in support of the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet and the EA-18G Growler.The deal, announced Thursday by the Department of Defense, is valued at more than $ 18.7 million under the terms of a cost-plus-fixed-fee delivery order, which is a modification to a previous award.The contract from Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division, out of Orlando, Fla., enables Boeing to integrate advanced software to the Tactical Operational Flight Trainer sensor models on F/A/-18E/F Super Hornet and the EA-18G Growler, according to a Defense Department contract announcement.Work on the contract will occur throughout the U.S. and Japan. The contract is expected to be complete in July 2021.The total amount of the contract award will be ob...
Phone embeds fingerprint sensor within screen

Phone embeds fingerprint sensor within screen

Technology
Smartphones may soon have fingerprint sensors embedded within screens, thanks to new technological advancements.A prototype of the first ever phone with a scanner within the display was revealed at this year's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.Rather than being developed by Apple or Samsung, the world-first was manufactured by Chinese technology company Vivo, which is little known in Western markets.As reviewed by technology publication 9to5Google, the in-display sensor is a lot slower than those previously seen in smartphones, but is just as accurate."In our hands-on demo of the product, the functionality was pretty much flawless," said 9to5Google."Clearly, this technology is still in its early days, but it's an impressive start nonetheless."Hopefully, we'll see this tech debut on mo...
BAE receives $40M from Lockheed for sensor technology

BAE receives $40M from Lockheed for sensor technology

Business
Nov. 2 (UPI) -- BAE Systems announced Wednesday that the defense contractor has begun production on its sensor technology for the Long Range Anti-Ship Missile, or LRASM, following a $ 40 million prime contractor order from Lockheed Martin.The sensor technology will enable the AGM-158C LRASM anti-ship cruise missile that's currently under development for the U.S. Navy to "seek and attack specific high-threat maritime targets within the groups of ships, including those protected by sophisticated anti-aircraft system," the company said.The sensor technology will be used by the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force, BAE said.The LRASM is said to be a "next-generation" precision-guided stealth missile that relies on precision routing and sensor guidance technology versus intelligence, surveillance, ...
New laser sensor could detect explosives, dangerous gases more quickly

New laser sensor could detect explosives, dangerous gases more quickly

Science
Sept. 29 (UPI) -- Scientists have developed a new laser-based spectroscopic method for identifying potentially dangerous gasses. The method, which relies on the combination of two spectroscopic techniques, could be used to more quickly and accurately identify explosives and other dangerous substances.The first technique, called multi-dimensional coherent spectroscopy, relies on short laser pulses. When bounced through a mixture of gases, scientists can measure which wavelengths are absorbed and use their observations to identify the gas molecules."If you have light going through the gas, and, for example, you use a prism to separate white light into colored light, in the rainbow spectrum you'd see there'd be black stripes," Steven Cundiff, a physics professor at the University of Michigan,...