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Tag: sensors

FLIR Surveillance awarded $12.6M for sensors aboard littoral combat ships

FLIR Surveillance awarded $12.6M for sensors aboard littoral combat ships

Business
Aug. 16 (UPI) -- FLIR Surveillance Inc. received a $ 12.6 million contract for supplies, repairs and upgrades to sensor systems aboard U.S. Navy littoral combat ships. The contract, announced Thursday by the Defense Department, refers to FLIR's Saffire III Electro-Optics Sensor Systems. The systems offer image stabilization, long-range and thermal imaging and color and low-light cameras. The systems are useful in search and rescue operations, reconnaissance, border and coastal patrol and target identification, the manufacturer said. Thousands of the ball-shaped 22-pound systems, which attach to horizontal planes of a vessel or aircraft, have been affixed to helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, as well as on the shallow-water littoral combat ships. The unit includes an optional sensor sys...
Acacia ants' vibrational sensors can differentiate between nibbles and wind

Acacia ants' vibrational sensors can differentiate between nibbles and wind

Science
Feb. 15 (UPI) -- Acacia ants have an exceptional sense of vibration. As a new study revealed, the ants, which live in and on Africa's acacia trees, can tell the difference between the vibrational patterns made by wind rustling the tree's leaves and those made by a munching herbivore. The ants aren't afraid of being eaten themselves. Instead, the vibrations trigger ants to patrol the branches of the tree and fend off animals looking to eat the tree's leaves and bark. In return for the ants' defensive efforts, the acacia tree provides the insect colonies with nutritious nectar and shelter in the form of hollow thorns. "The vibrations that occur when a mammal plucks a leaf are so powerful that they spread across the whole tree and are perceived by the ants," Felix Hager of Ruhr University Bo...
Scientists use rover's navigational sensors to measure Mars' gravity

Scientists use rover's navigational sensors to measure Mars' gravity

Science
Feb. 1 (UPI) -- Scientists were able to map Mars' gravity by repurposing data collected by the Curiosity rover's navigational sensors. After realizing Curiosity's accelerometers can be used like gravimeters when the rover is at a standstill, scientists surveyed navigational data collected during the mission's first five years. Researchers were able to plot changes in the Red Planet's gravity along the path the rover took as it ascended Mount Sharp. The new gravity data allowed scientists to estimate the density of the underlying rock along the rover's route. Gravity is weaker on the slopes of Mount Sharp than scientists expected, suggesting the sedimentary rock that forms the mountain isn't all that dense. "The lower levels of Mount Sharp are surprisingly porous," Kevin Lewis of Johns Hop...
Thales to develop Rafale F4 sensors for French military

Thales to develop Rafale F4 sensors for French military

Business
Jan. 18 (UPI) -- France's defense ministry has awarded Thales a contract to develop onboard sensors and communication systems for Rafale F-4 combat aircraft. The agreement allows the combat aircraft "to maintain its superiority against new threats," Thales said in a news release Friday. On Monday, France's government signed a $ 2.3 billion contract for 28 updated Rafale fighter jets from French-headquartered Dassault Aviation. In all, 500 French firms are part of the Rafale program, including Dassault Aviation, which will serve as the industrial architect and be responsible for deploying new connectivity solutions. Rafale's role includes reconnaissance, air defense and precision strikes during a single mission. The company noted the aircraft is "a crucial component of France's National S...
Tomorrow's Cities: How Barcelona shushed noise-makers with sensors

Tomorrow's Cities: How Barcelona shushed noise-makers with sensors

Technology
Media playback is unsupported on your device In the heart of the bustling city of Barcelona is a square that at first sight seems like an oasis of calm. The Plaza del Sol, as the name suggests, is a suntrap and the perfect place to while away a few hours.The problem is that the square is just too popular and for many of the city's young inhabitants has become the number one venue to meet friends and hang out until the small hours.One resident said it was like living in a permanent party.Even the shops around the square reflect its reputation for late-night carousing, selling beer, pizza and little else.The situation had become unbearable for those with apartments around the square, who have lived with unacceptable noise levels for the past 20 ...