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Saturated fat should be maximum 10 percent of diet, WHO says

Saturated fat should be maximum 10 percent of diet, WHO says

Health
May 4 (UPI) -- A person's diet should contain only 10 percent of saturated fats and 1 percent from trans fats, according to new draft guidelines issued Friday by the World Health Organization.The new guidelines are part of an attempt to reduce deaths from cardiovascular diseases. WHO is launching the initiative because cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of noncommunicable deaths in the world, with around one-third of all 54.7 million deaths worldwide in 2016 attributed to them."Modifiable risk factors such as unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, tobacco use and harmful use of alcohol are major causes of CVDs," the WHO said in a press release. "Dietary saturated fatty acids and trans-fatty acids are of particular concern as high levels of intake are correlated with increased risk...
After romaine lettuce outbreak, here's what you should know about E. Coli

After romaine lettuce outbreak, here's what you should know about E. Coli

Health
Concerns are rising amid the nationwide outbreak of food poisoning from E. Coli that has killed one person in California and infected 121 so far, according to official counts. 52 people have been hospitalized. Romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona, is the culprit in these E. Coli infections, but the victims are spread among 25 states. The bacteria carried on the lettuce is a strain called E. Coli 0157:H7 What is E. Coli 0157:H7? Escherichilia coli, or E. Coli, is a large group of bacteria with multiple strains, most of which are harmless and part of the normal “flora” of bacteria in the digestive tract. Harmful strains of E. Coli produce something called a Shiga toxin, which can be deadly. The most common strain of deadly E. Coli in the U.S. -- the one linked to multiple outbreaks and
6 Things You Should NEVER Buy at a Grocery Store

6 Things You Should NEVER Buy at a Grocery Store

Health
There’s a right way to do your grocery shopping — and, almost by definition, a wrong way. In search of higher profits, supermarkets try to woo you with products that are more convenient, but also more expensive. These products include ready-made items that can be prepared much more cheaply at home, produce you’d be better off buying in its simplest form, and non-food items that are significantly less expensive at other retailers.I asked a couple of budget-minded bloggers to help me identify which supermarket offerings can blow your food budget — and then I ran the numbers myself. (To avoid having the results skewed by the high grocery prices in New York City, where most of MONEY’s staff lives, I used pricing from a Kroger supermarket in Mount Pleasant, Mich.)Here are the items to avoid.Pre