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Tag: Should

How should I invest my inheritance money?

How should I invest my inheritance money?

Finance
Sallie Krawcheck wants to close the 'gender investing gap'What are the best ways for 20-somethings to invest inheritance money? -- Jason Staring at a new big balance in your bank account can be exciting. It can also freak you out. On one hand, an inheritance could open up new financial opportunities: paying off your student debt once and for all, buying a home, going on a big vacation, starting a business. You're not alone if your first inclination is to buy a boat, throw a lavish party, or put it all into the stock market. People often don't treat the money received through some kind of windfall the same way they do their regular income. There's even science behind it. A concept called "mental accounting" explains why we value some money differently than other money, according to the w...
A bearish economist likes the 'most under-owned market on the planet,' and he thinks you should too

A bearish economist likes the 'most under-owned market on the planet,' and he thinks you should too

Finance
He may be one of Wall Street's biggest bears, but that doesn't mean veteran market watcher David Rosenberg isn't finding places to put money to work.Gluskin Sheff's chief economist and strategist is just going halfway around the globe to do it."The one part of the world which looks very good to me right now, a great turnaround story that's under-owned, is Japan. The Nikkei is breaking out," said Rosenberg said Friday on CNBC's "Trading Nation." He added: "I think even a child could see that the 30-year secular downtrend has been broken over the course of the past couple of months."The Nikkei 225, Japan's benchmark stock index, has soared nearly ten percent over the past three months. It's now up 15-percent so far this year. But it's still about 56 percent way from its all-time high hit in ...
End-of-year hiring should bring joy to job seekers

End-of-year hiring should bring joy to job seekers

Finance
Whether you're looking for permanent employment or a seasonal gig around the holidays, CareerBuilder's latest forecast predicts an uptick in both jobs and pay.Between August and September, CareerBuilder surveyed more than 2,250 hiring managers and human resources professionals as well as 3,700 full-time workers.About 43 percent of employers plan to hire full-time, permanent employees in the fourth quarter, up from 34 percent in 2016, and 73 percent plan to increase wages.Target is one employer increasing wages. Last week, the big-box chain announced it was raising pay to $ 15 an hour.Higher wages couldn't come too soon. A single worker will soon need to earn at least $ 15 an hour just to afford the basics, recent research shows. CareerBuilder found that 35 percent of employers expect to hi...
The 25 Greatest Kitchen Hacks Every Cook Should Know

The 25 Greatest Kitchen Hacks Every Cook Should Know

Health
1 of 25Photo: Jennifer Causey 1. Make Hard-Cooked Eggs a Cinch to Peel This article originally appeared on CookingLight.com.Instead of boiling the traditional way, steam up to a dozen eggs in a steamer basket suspended over boiling water for 15 to 16 minutes; shells slip right off.Advertisement2 of 25Photo: Jennifer Causey 2. Make the Best Roasted Veggies Place the pan in the oven as it preheats; when the vegetables hit that hot surface, they get a delicious jump-start on browning.3 of 25Illustration: Olivier Kugler 3. Improvise a Brush When you can't find your pastry or basting brush—or don't have one—make a quick, disposable stand-in:
Why Millennials should be really worried about the Equifax breach

Why Millennials should be really worried about the Equifax breach

Finance
Freezing your credit after Equifax hack...not so easyIt seems like every other day we read about a major hack or security breach that exposes our personal or financial information. But last week's news about a data breach at Equifax, one of the three major credit reporting agencies, was different. The type of information accessed -- Social Security numbers, birthdays, addresses -- was particularly extensive, leaving nearly half of all Americans vulnerable to identity theft. Thieves who get hold of your personal information can open bank accounts, new credit cards or lines of credit in your name -- and destroy your credit in the process. Identity theft is bad news for everyone, but it's especially dangerous for young adults. Millennials may need their credit sooner When you try to open a ...