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Hip and knee replacements show high durability, study shows

Hip and knee replacements show high durability, study shows

Health
Feb. 15 (UPI) -- Most hip replacements last well after the surgery was performed, a new study says. About six in 10 hip replacements performed 25 years ago have remained in place, according to a new study published Thursday in The Lancet. Additionally, 89 percent were still in place 15 years later and 70 percent lasted 20 years. "Over two million hip and knee replacements have been performed in the UK since 2003 and patients often ask clinicians how long their hip or knee replacement will last, but until now, we have not had a generalizable answer," Jonathan Evans, a researcher at the Bristol Medical School and study lead author, said in a news release. This new research also shows that durability comes along with knee replacement surgery. About 90 percent of total knee replacements and 7...
Watch: Stephen Curry's mom, Sonya, shows off range with half-court shot

Watch: Stephen Curry's mom, Sonya, shows off range with half-court shot

Sports
Feb. 15 (UPI) -- Golden State Warriors star point guard Stephen Curry is used to heaving deep 3-pointers and making each with ease. Curry's mother, Sonya, proved the shooting touch runs in the family during a Curry Family Foundation event at the Carole Hoefener Center on Friday in their hometown of Charlotte. The Curry family was divided into teams of four for a shooting contest. Stephen and his wife, Ayesha, were the first team. Portland Trail Blazers guard and Stephen's brother, Seth Curry, along with his fianceé, Calle Rivers, made up the second team. Warriors backup guard Damion Lee and his wife, Sydel, who is the sister of Stephen and Seth, comprised the third team. Father and former Charlotte Hornets sharpshooter Dell Curry and Sonya were the fourth team. The All-Star Weekend...
Exercise can reduce risk for depression, research shows

Exercise can reduce risk for depression, research shows

Health
Jan. 24 (UPI) -- New research suggests that people who get more physical activity have lower levels of depression. People who wore motion-detecting sensors called accelerometers on their wrists to monitor their exercise fought off depression better than people who self-reported their physical activity, according to findings published Wednesday in JAMA Psychiatry. "Using genetic data, we found evidence that higher levels of physical activity may causally reduce risk for depression," Karmel Choi, a researcher of the Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit in the MGH Center for Genomic Medicine and study lead author, said in a news release. "Knowing whether an associated factor actually causes an outcome is important, because we want to invest in preventive strategies that really wo...