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Tag: shows

Bitcoin’s latest slump shows why people should be cautious before investing in cryptocurrency

Finance
Hermione Granger | Moment | Getty ImagesIn the last few weeks, bitcoin has been on a wild ride, surging to record highs and then wiping hundreds of billions of dollars from the cryptocurrency market days later.The volatility shows why curious investors should pause before putting money into the cryptocurrency.Bitcoin had an epic runup early in 2021. The asset hit a record high of $ 41,973 on Jan. 12, according to data from Coin Metrics, but just days later fell about 15%, wiping as much as $ 200 billion from the cryptocurrency market in just 24 hours.The next week, it regained some of its losses, surging to near $ 40,000 before reversing course yet again. On Thursday, the cryptocurrency slipped about 8%, bringing the asset's two-day losses to more than 10%. In addition, the price of bit...
What to binge: 5 shows to watch after ‘Bridgerton’

What to binge: 5 shows to watch after ‘Bridgerton’

Entertainment
Jan. 7 (UPI) -- Shonda Rhimes' Regency romance drama Bridgerton is Netflix's latest hit. The streaming service projects that 63 million households will watch Bridgerton in its first four weeks, which will make it Netflix's fifth-biggest original series launch. In its first four weeks, Bridgerton is projected to court more than 63 million households, which would make it Netflix's fifth biggest original series launched to date. pic.twitter.com/Zs7N3NBh9i— Netflix Queue (@netflixqueue) January 4, 2021 Advertisement The show is a reimagining of the Julia Quinn book series, which follows the titular Bridgertons. Season 1 is based on the first novel, The Duke and I, which features the romance between Daphne Bridgerton (Phoebe Dynevor) and Simon, the Duke of Hastings (Regé-Jean Page). The dra
TV shows, films, books and music to help you through another lockdown

TV shows, films, books and music to help you through another lockdown

Entertainment
.css-94m6rd-HeadingWrapper{border-bottom:solid 1px #BABABA;padding-bottom:1.5rem;}.css-94m6rd-HeadingWrapper > *:not([hidden]):not(style) ~ *:not([hidden]):not(style){margin-top:1rem;}.css-uf6wea-RichTextComponentWrapper{margin:1rem 0;max-width:36.25rem;}.css-83cqas-RichTextContainer{color:#3F3F42;}.css-83cqas-RichTextContainer > *:not([hidden]):not(style) ~ *:not([hidden]):not(style){margin-top:1rem;}.css-14iz86j-BoldText{font-weight:bold;}With most of the UK back under lockdown, we'll be shut indoors and looking for entertainment and escapism over the coming weeks. So here's a selection of TV shows, films, books and music that could help make lockdown life a bit more bearable..css-mysbf6-ComponentWrapper-CrossheadComponentWrapper{margin:1.5rem 0;max-width:50rem;padding-top:1rem;max-width...
Proof-of-concept study shows dogs can detect COVID-19 in human sweat

Proof-of-concept study shows dogs can detect COVID-19 in human sweat

Health
Dec. 10 (UPI) -- "Working" dogs trained to perform search and rescue tasks, detect explosives or diseases such as colon cancer correctly identified people infected with COVID-19 up to 100% of the time, French researchers said Thursday. The findings suggest that dogs can confirm the presence of the virus by sniffing samples of human sweat, the researchers said in an article published by the journal PLOS ONE. Advertisement Although the results still need to be confirmed in larger studies, this proof-of-concept study indicates that trained dogs could provide a "non-invasive" alternative to currently available tests, researchers said. The dogs also could be used to detect people infected with COVID-19 in public places and hopefully prevent them from spreading the disease to others, the resear...
Data shows demilitarizing police doesn’t put officers or the public at risk

Data shows demilitarizing police doesn’t put officers or the public at risk

Science
Dec. 7 (UPI) -- According to a new study, demilitarizing U.S. police departments doesn't lead to an uptick in crime or jeopardize police safety. In the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, many police departments began acquiring armored vehicles, body armor and other types of military grade weapons and equipment with funding from the Department of Homeland Security. Advertisement Militarized police units have since become commonplace, researchers say. This summer, units armed with helmets, shields, tear gas and rubber bullets were frequently deployed to break up protests sparked in response to deaths of civilians, like George Floyd, at the hands of police officers. Police advocates claim the transfer of surplus military equipment to law enforcement has led to reductions in crime, but...