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Danielle Lloyd wades into Vardy WAG row to claim of ‘similar run-ins’

Danielle Lloyd wades into Vardy WAG row to claim of ‘similar run-ins’

Entertainment
Danielle Lloyd has waded into the explosive row between WAGs Coleen Rooney and Rebekah Vardy which has sparked headlines across the globe.Yesterday, Coleen Rooney accused Vardy of passing stories about her to The Sun newspaper - something Vardy strenuously denies. Now, model Lloyd has claimed to have also had "run-ins" with Vardy, who is said to be "devastated" about the situation. Image: Coleen Rooney (right) has accused Rebekah Vardy (left) of passing stories to the press. Pic: Ken McKay The row between the two women, who are known in the tabloid press as WAGs (wives and girlfriends of footballers), sparked worldwide coverage - with headlines appearing in The New York Times and Germany's Bild newspaper.Model Danielle Lloyd waded int...
Woolly mammoths, Neanderthals had similar genetic traits

Woolly mammoths, Neanderthals had similar genetic traits

Science
April 8 (UPI) -- Woolly mammoths and Neanderthals shared similar genetic traits, according to a new study. Researchers suggest the similar genes allowed both mammals to thrive in cold environs. Both species can trace their lineage to Africa, but woolly mammoths first emerged in Eurasia some 600,000 years ago, while Neanderthals emerged in Europe and spread into Eurasia around 450,000 years ago. Scientists at Tel Aviv University, who recently compared the genomes of the mammals, suspect their shared environs explain the similar genetic traits. Neanderthals were highly-skilled humans that lived alongside -- and interbred with -- Homo sapiens for thousands of years. Their adaptability allowed them to spread across much of Europe and Eurasia, but the latest research suggests they possessed g...
Some with schizophrenia have similar brain function to healthy people

Some with schizophrenia have similar brain function to healthy people

Health
Jan. 4 (UPI) -- The brains of healthy people may be similar to those of people with schizophrenia, a study says. A study of 179 people -- 109 with schizophrenia and 70 without it -- published Friday in the American Journal of Psychiatry shows the brain similaries in MRI scans and facial recognition tests. The findings, which reflect participants with and without the condition, broke participants down into three distinct facial types -- typical, over-activated and de-activated profiles -- helping the researchers determine similarities and differences between each of them. "We think those with over-activated networks may be 'inefficient' in terms of brain activity -- they probably struggled more and needed to work harder to do the same task compared to the other groups," says Dr. Hawco. "Th...
Fossilized dinosaur proteins and burnt toast feature similar chemical compounds

Fossilized dinosaur proteins and burnt toast feature similar chemical compounds

Science
Nov. 9 (UPI) -- Under the right conditions, a dinosaur's soft tissue can be transformed and preserved, enabling fossilization. The process features chemical transformations similar to those that characterize browned or burnt toast. Scientists have long debated whether soft tissue can be preserved within dinosaur bones. While hard tissue -- bones, eggs, teeth, scales -- can survive for more than 100 million years, most studies suggest the proteins that form blood vessels, cells and nerves are fully degraded after 4 million years. And yet, paleontologists have regularly found organic structures similar to cells and blood vessels inside 100-million-old dinosaur bones. To better understand this paradox, researchers at Yale, the American Museum of Natural History, the University of Brussels an...
Prime numbers, crystals share similar structural patterns

Prime numbers, crystals share similar structural patterns

Science
Sept. 6 (UPI) -- According to a new study, the distribution of prime numbers is similar to the positioning of atoms inside some crystalline materials. When scientists at Princeton University compared the pattern of prime numbers along a lengthy line of numbers with the atomic patterns revealed when crystals are blasted with X-rays, they were surprised by the similarities. "There is much more order in prime numbers than ever previously discovered," Salvatore Torquato, professor of chemistry and the Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, said in a news release. "We showed that the primes behave almost like a crystal or, more precisely, similar to a crystal-like material called a 'quasicrystal.'" Until recently, mathematicians thought prime numbers, numbers divisibl...