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Tag: skull

Study links low-dose aspirin to bleeding inside the skull

Study links low-dose aspirin to bleeding inside the skull

Health
May 13 (UPI) -- People without a history of heart disease and stroke who took low-dose aspirin were more likely to experience bleeding inside the skull, according to a new study. Historically, the use of low-dose aspirin has been recommended for older adults as a way to reduce the risk of stroke or heart attack. The over-the-counter pain medication can prevent blood clots from forming. When fatty deposits called atherosclerotic plaques form in arteries, pieces of plaque can break off and trigger clotting, preventing adequate blood flow to the brain or heart. The use of low-dose aspirin has garnered criticism in recent years. Several recent studies have shown the drug increases the risk of heavy bleeding. The latest research, published this week in the journal JAMA Neurology, suggests reg...
Ancient skull provides earliest evidence of modern humans in Mongolia

Ancient skull provides earliest evidence of modern humans in Mongolia

Science
Jan. 30 (UPI) -- An ancient Mongolian skull thought to belong to the a unique species of Pleistocene hominin, dubbed Mongolanthropus, is actually the earliest evidence of modern humans in the region. Using radiocarbon dating and DNA analysis, paleontologists determined the skull belonged to Homo sapiens. The discovery is described in a new paper published Wednesday in the journal Nature Communications. As a result of compromised dating efforts and the fossil's archaic skull features, some researchers previously hypothesized the hominid remains hailed from the mid to late Pleistocene and belonged to Homo erectus or the Neanderthals. The new analysis posits that the modern human specimen lived sometime between 34,950 and 33,900 years ago. Because the skull is contaminated with a variety of...
Skull scans reveal how prehistoric dogs caught dinner

Skull scans reveal how prehistoric dogs caught dinner

Science
Jan. 11 (UPI) -- To better understand how the earliest dogs hunted, scientists scanned and analyzed the skulls of lions, wolves and hyenas. The research showed the earliest known dog species, Hesperocyon gregarius, likely pounced on its prey, just like foxes and coyotes. Scientists also determined the largest known dog species, Epicyon haydeni, were the size of grizzly bears. Computerized scans of animal skeletons have previously helped scientists to better understand the locomotion of various species. Researchers at Scotland's University Edinburgh and the University of Vienna in Austria used previous scans to build digital models of the inner ears of 36 different carnivore species, allowing them to hone in on the specific hunting methods used by various predators. The modeling effort sho...
Incredible 'sea monster' skull revealed in 3D

Incredible 'sea monster' skull revealed in 3D

Science
Some 200 million years ago in what is now Warwickshire, a dolphin-like reptile died and sank to the bottom of the sea. The creature's burial preserved its skull in stunning detail - enabling scientists to digitally reconstruct it.The fossil, unveiled in the journal PeerJ, gives a unique insight into the life of an ichthyosaur. The ferocious creature would have fed upon fish, squid and likely others of its kind. Its bones were found in a farmer's field more than 60 years ago, but their significance has only just come to light. Remarkably, the skull is three-dimensionally preserved and contains bones that are rarely exposed. "It's taken more than half a century for this ichthyosaur to be studied and described, but it has been worth...
Hole in cow's skull may be proof of early medical experimentation

Hole in cow's skull may be proof of early medical experimentation

Science
April 19 (UPI) -- More than 5,000 years ago, a group of people living in what's now France drilled a hole in a cow's head. Researchers believe the ancient bovine skull is the earliest evidence of animal surgery yet recovered.Scientists used advanced imaging to study the hole and determined it could not have been made by a violent encounter with another animal. Aside from the hole, the skull and related bones show no evidence of trauma. As such, scientists believe the hole was made purposefully by humans.Paleontologists and archaeologists have found similar holes in human skulls as old as 10,000 years."I have analyzed many, many human skulls ... all from the neolithic period and they all show the same techniques -- and the technique you can observe in the cow's skull [is] the same," Fernand...