News That Matters

Tag: skull

KSI vows to knock Logan Paul out ‘by round five’ and sends chilling message to American’s brother: ‘I’d like to break Jake Paul’s skull’

KSI vows to knock Logan Paul out ‘by round five’ and sends chilling message to American’s brother: ‘I’d like to break Jake Paul’s skull’

Sports
KSI has told talkSPORT he will knock Logan Paul out by the FIFTH round of their boxing rematch.The two Youtubers will fight each other in the ring for a second time after battling to a draw in their first bout – the rematch taking place at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. Getty The two couldn’t be separated at the first fight in August 2018 Brit KSI also took the opportunity to send a chilling message to Paul’s younger brother Jake, who is also a Youtuber, that he’d like to “break Jake Paul’s skull.” At the KSI vs Logan Paul rematch press conference in London, KSI insisted that Paul will not be able to deal with him come November 9. He told Gareth A Davies: “November 9th I’m knocking him out by round five. There’s nothing he can do about it. “He can lift
Face of Lucy’s ancestors revealed by 3.8 million-year-old skull in Ethiopia

Face of Lucy’s ancestors revealed by 3.8 million-year-old skull in Ethiopia

Science
Aug. 28 (UPI) -- The discovery of a rare 3.8-million-year-old hominin skull unearthed in Ethiopia promises to offer fresh insights into the complexities of early human evolution. The fossil's jaw and teeth suggest it belongs to the species Australopithecus anamensis, an ancestor of the famed Lucy hominin, Australopithecus afarensis. Researchers have previously found only fragments of A. anamensis, most around 4 million years old. Until now, paleontologists surmised that A. afarensis slowly morphed into A. anamensis -- that their evolutionary relationship was linear. The latest discovery, detailed this week in the journal Nature, suggests otherwise -- that two species overlapped on the evolutionary timeline. The specimen, dubbed MRD cranium, was found at a dig site in Ethiopia's Afar Regi...
Face of Lucy’s ancestors revealed by 3.8-million-year-old hominin skull in Ethiopia

Face of Lucy’s ancestors revealed by 3.8-million-year-old hominin skull in Ethiopia

Science
Aug. 28 (UPI) -- The discovery of a rare 3.8-million-year-old hominin skull unearthed in Ethiopia promises to offer fresh insights into the complexities of early human evolution. The fossil's jaw and teeth suggest it belongs to the species Australopithecus anamensis, an ancestor of the famed Lucy hominin, Australopithecus afarensis. Researchers have previously found only fragments of A. anamensis, most around 4 million years old. Until now, paleontologists surmised that A. afarensis slowly morphed into A. anamensis -- that their evolutionary relationship was linear. The latest discovery, detailed this week in the journal Nature, suggests otherwise -- that two species overlapped on the evolutionary timeline. The specimen, dubbed MRD cranium, was found at a dig site in Ethiopia's Afar Regi...
Study links low-dose aspirin to bleeding inside the skull

Study links low-dose aspirin to bleeding inside the skull

Health
May 13 (UPI) -- People without a history of heart disease and stroke who took low-dose aspirin were more likely to experience bleeding inside the skull, according to a new study. Historically, the use of low-dose aspirin has been recommended for older adults as a way to reduce the risk of stroke or heart attack. The over-the-counter pain medication can prevent blood clots from forming. When fatty deposits called atherosclerotic plaques form in arteries, pieces of plaque can break off and trigger clotting, preventing adequate blood flow to the brain or heart. The use of low-dose aspirin has garnered criticism in recent years. Several recent studies have shown the drug increases the risk of heavy bleeding. The latest research, published this week in the journal JAMA Neurology, suggests reg...
Ancient skull provides earliest evidence of modern humans in Mongolia

Ancient skull provides earliest evidence of modern humans in Mongolia

Science
Jan. 30 (UPI) -- An ancient Mongolian skull thought to belong to the a unique species of Pleistocene hominin, dubbed Mongolanthropus, is actually the earliest evidence of modern humans in the region. Using radiocarbon dating and DNA analysis, paleontologists determined the skull belonged to Homo sapiens. The discovery is described in a new paper published Wednesday in the journal Nature Communications. As a result of compromised dating efforts and the fossil's archaic skull features, some researchers previously hypothesized the hominid remains hailed from the mid to late Pleistocene and belonged to Homo erectus or the Neanderthals. The new analysis posits that the modern human specimen lived sometime between 34,950 and 33,900 years ago. Because the skull is contaminated with a variety of...