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Tag: sleep

More schools are starting classes later to let students sleep

More schools are starting classes later to let students sleep

Health
The Seattle school district joined dozens of school districts around the country in the fall of 2016 by delaying the start of school. Under the new rules, instead of beginning at 7:50 a.m., they began at 8:45 a.m. This gave researchers at the University of Washington an opportunity to determine just how much teens need sleep. In a new study, they used activity monitors to study a group of high school sophomores before and after the changes were implemented and found that with later start times, students were not only getting an extra half-hour of sleep, their grades had improved by nearly 5 percentage points too. Sleep is important for everyone, but even more so for teens, who are constantly losing sleep because of their busy schedules. Here’s why they need it even more: Studi...
Daylight saving time: How it affects your sleep, and tips to adjust to the extra hour

Daylight saving time: How it affects your sleep, and tips to adjust to the extra hour

Health
It’s here, some people’s favorite weekend between Halloween and Thanksgiving –- the end of Daylight Saving Time. Remember to “fall back” this Sunday – most of our nation gets a bonus. But don't make a common mistake: Turning that extra hour into an extra hour of sleep. We'll explain, but first, the basics. November 4 at 2 a.m., most of the country will move from Daylight Saving Time (DST) to Standard Time (ST). No. If you live in Hawaii, Guam, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa and most of Arizona, your clocks will stay the same. For the rest of you –- enjoy your bonus hour. Janet Kennedy, PhD., clinical psychologist and founder of NYC Sleep Doctor, says the best strategy is to switch to the new time right away -- stick to ...
Brain organizes forgettable, indelible memories during sleep

Brain organizes forgettable, indelible memories during sleep

Science
Oct. 5 (UPI) -- Previous studies have highlighted the important role sleep plays in learning and memory formation. New research suggests, during sleep, a person's brain replays memories that go un-recalled when awake. For their study, neuroscientists in Germany recruited epilepsy patients electrodes implanted in their brains for surgical planning. The electrodes allowed scientists to precisely record brain activity patterns. Researchers had participants memorize a series of images. Each image was associated with a unique pattern of brain activity. Later, scientists measured the participants' neural activity while they napped. Researchers were able to recognize the gamma band activity signatures of each images. Their analysis showed, during sleep, the participants' brains reimagined each o...
Too much screen time, too little sleep linked to child development problems: Study

Too much screen time, too little sleep linked to child development problems: Study

Health
The average American child spends 3.6 hours staring at a computer, television, tablet, or smartphone daily -- an amount of screen time associated with inferior cognitive development and academic performance, according to a new study of over 4,500 children between the ages of eight and 11 published yesterday in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health. The study was conducted by Canadian researchers, but examined children in the U.S. using the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth. Those guidelines recommend that children get nine to 11 hours of uninterrupted sleep, less than two hours of screen time and at least one hour of physical activity every day. The children who scored best on tests for assessing language abilities, memory, executive function, attention, and proc...
Children sleep on floor in cages of US border 'prison'

Children sleep on floor in cages of US border 'prison'

World
Young migrant children, many of whom have been taken from their parents' arms, are being kept in cages in facilities along the southern US border, according to journalists who were allowed inside. The Border Patrol responded to criticism and protests over US President Donald Trump's "zero tolerance" policy for illegal immigrants by allowing the visit to the facility in south Texas.Photos from inside a former warehouse the media were given access to showed people divided into separate wings for unaccompanied children, adults on their own and mothers and fathers with children. Image: A young girl is given some soup at a migration centre in Texas Associated Press reported that the lights stay on for 24 hours a day and the...