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Tag: smartphone

Smartphone makers bet on foldable screens as next big thing

Smartphone makers bet on foldable screens as next big thing

Technology
For the past few years, the smartphone industry has been searching for a breakthrough to revive a market mired in an innovation lull and a sales slump. A potential catalyst is on the horizon in the form of flexible screens that can be folded in half without breaking. Samsung and several rivals are preparing to roll out such screens to make devices more versatile for work and pleasure. The foldable screens could increase display space to the size of a mini-tablet, but fold like a wallet so they revert to the size of regular phones. But there are questions about price and durability. If the new phones fulfill their makers' ambitions, they will become a leap ahead for an industry whose origins can be traced to the old flip phones that consumers once embraced as cool and convenient. Foldable...
GP at Hand's smartphone doctor ads ruled misleading

GP at Hand's smartphone doctor ads ruled misleading

Technology
Adverts for a smartphone GP service that promised NHS doctor appointments "in minutes" have been ruled misleading by the Advertising Standards Authority.The service offers a symptom-checker and free GP consultations via videolink on smartphones.The ASA received complaints that the ads did not say users would first have to leave their GP, and registration could take up to three weeks.GP at Hand said it thought the process was "self-evident".Another criticism upheld was that the ads did not state that potential users must live within 40 minutes of one of five surgery catchment areas in London in order to see a GP in person.The ads were displayed on the London Underground transport network as well as online between November 2017 and February 2018. GP online:...
Smartphone screens 'dirtier than toilet seats'

Smartphone screens 'dirtier than toilet seats'

Technology
The average smartphone screen has been found to be more than three times dirtier than a toilet seat. More than a third of people (35%) have never cleaned their phone with wipes, a cleaning fluid or a similar product, research carried out by Insurance2go found.One in 20 smartphone users was found to clean their phone less than every six months.The firm swabbed three popular handsets - an iPhone 6, a Samsung Galaxy 8 and a Google Pixel, to test for aerobic bacteria, yeast and mould.The results revealed that all key areas of the the phones harbour at least some quantity of each type of substance. Image: Researchers put the germs in growing conditions so they would become visible Insurance2go measured the dirtiest parts of...
Huawei P20 Pro smartphone 'can see in the dark'

Huawei P20 Pro smartphone 'can see in the dark'

Technology
Media playback is unsupported on your deviceHuawei's latest smartphone can take photos in near-dark conditions without using its flash or a tripod.The P20 Pro takes exposures lasting up to six seconds to get enough light. It then uses artificial intelligence to deliver sharp images and avoid the blurring and smearing normally associated with employing this technique handheld.The Chinese company recently told the BBC it could soon become the world's bestselling smartphone brand.At present, it is in third place behind Samsung and Apple, with US telecom networks' refusal to sell its handsets proving an obstacle.Like Samsung's Galaxy S9-series phones - which recently went on sale - Huawei's pitch to consumers for the P20 Pro is largely based on its new camera capabilities.But while the South K...
Smartphone app allows doctors, nurses to remotely monitor wound healing

Smartphone app allows doctors, nurses to remotely monitor wound healing

Health
Jan. 19 (UPI) -- The healing of postoperative surgical wounds can be effectively monitored with a new smartphone app, new research indicates.The app, called WoundCheck, can be used to send digital images of a post-surgical wound with a short patient-administered questionnaire to monitoring nurses and could help reduce the need for post-surgical patient readmission, researchers report in a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute."We set out to come up with a protocol where patients could become active participants in their care and allow us to be in closer communication and monitor their wounds after they leave the hospital," Dr. Rebecca L. Gunter, a general surgery resident at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, said in a press release....