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Tag: smoking

Cigarette smoking in U.S. reaches all-time low

Cigarette smoking in U.S. reaches all-time low

Health
Nov. 8 (UPI) -- Cigarette smoking has reached an all-time low among U.S. adults -- 14 percent -- according to new data released by the U.S. government. Experts and researchers say the new data is proof that efforts to decrease the rates of smoking in the United States have been successful, but they say there is still much more work to be done. An estimated 34 million adults in the United States smoked cigarettes either every day or some days in 2017, which is down from 15.5 percent of adults in 2016 and 67 percent fewer since 1965, according to data released by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute. The most dramatic cigarette usage decline was among adults aged 18 to 24 years -- 10.4 ...
'Don't go cold turkey' to quit smoking

'Don't go cold turkey' to quit smoking

Health
Smokers looking to quit as part of the annual Stoptober campaign are being warned not to go "cold turkey". Government health officials have said smokers stand a much greater chance of succeeding giving up by using official NHS support or turning to e-cigarettes.Research has shown only 4% of those who go "cold turkey" remain smoke-free after a year. But turning to nicotine replacement therapies, such as patches or lozenges, can increase that by 1.5 times.And getting help from an NHS stop-smoking clinic leads to a four-fold rise in the chances of succeeding, according to Public Health England. 'One smoke leads to daily habit for most' Quit smoking campaign backs e-cigs This year's Stoptober campaign will see the introduction of a free online personal quit p...
Child passive smoking 'increases chronic lung risk'

Child passive smoking 'increases chronic lung risk'

Health
Non-smoking adults have a higher risk of dying from serious lung disease if they grew up with parents who smoked, according to US research.The researchers said childhood passive smoking was "likely to add seven deaths to every 100,000 non-smoking adults dying annually".The study of 70,900 non-smoking men and women was led by the American Cancer Society.Experts said the best way to protect children was to quit smoking.If participants lived with a smoker during adulthood, there were other health implications, the study found.Smoke exposure of 10 or more hours every week increased their risk of death from ischemic heart disease by 27%, stroke by 23% and chronic obstructive lung disease by 42% compared to those who lived with non-smokers.The study was publish...
E-cigarettes can be key weapon against smoking, say MPs

E-cigarettes can be key weapon against smoking, say MPs

Health
Rules around e-cigarettes should be relaxed so they can be more widely used and accepted in society, says a report by MPs.Vaping is much less harmful than normal cigarettes and e-cigarettes should be made available on prescription to help more people quit smoking, it said.The report also asks the government to consider their use on buses and trains.There is no evidence e-cigarettes are a gateway into smoking for young people, Public Health England said. The report on e-cigarettes, by the science and technology MPs' committee, said they were too often overlooked by the NHS as a tool to help people stop smoking.For example, it said it was "unacceptable" that a third of the 50 NHS mental health trusts in England had a ban on e-cigar...
HIV and smoking a lethal combo for the lungs

HIV and smoking a lethal combo for the lungs

Health
MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 -- HIV patients who take their medication but also smoke are about 10 times more likely to die from lung cancer than from AIDS-related causes, a new study estimates.Lifesaving antiretroviral drugs have improved life expectancy to the point that patients now have more to fear from tobacco than HIV, said lead researcher Dr. Krishna Reddy."Thanks to antiretroviral medicines, people with HIV are living longer," said Reddy, a pulmonologist and critical care doctor with Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. "The bad news is that they're living long enough to get cancer."Based on the new findings, smoking cessation should be a focus of treatment, he and his colleagues said.More than 40 percent of people with HIV are smokers, a rate more than double that of the general p...