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Tag: smoking

Smoking after cancer diagnosis raises healthcare costs, study says

Smoking after cancer diagnosis raises healthcare costs, study says

Health
April 5 (UPI) -- Smoking after a cancer diagnosis can lead to soaring healthcare costs, a new study says. On average, smoking after a cancer diagnosis can lift costs by an additional $ 11,000 per patient, according to research published Friday in JAMA Open Network. "These data estimate that smoking could result in $ 3.4 billion in additional cancer treatment costs national if patients continue to smoke after being diagnosed with cancer," Graham Warren, vice chairman at the radiation oncology center at the University of South Carolina and study lead author, said in a news release. "We know that continued smoking can lead to bad treatment outcomes for patients with cancer. The 2014 Surgeon General's Report concluded that continued smoking after a cancer diagnosis increases the risk of dyin...
Vaping vexes regulators: Smoking cessation tool or gateway drug?

Vaping vexes regulators: Smoking cessation tool or gateway drug?

Health
Feb. 13 (UPI) -- While some view e-cigarettes like Juul as a way to quit smoking, others see the product as a pathway for young people to be introduced to nicotine -- posing a problem for federal regulators. The question for officials at the Food and Drug Administration is, can e-cigarettes be used to help adults kick their addiction, while at the same time keeping them out of the hands of adolescents and teens? Scott Gottlieb, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, has previously threatened to halt sales of Juul, and other, e-cigarettes because of the growth in their use among young people. Earlier this week, he reiterated his concern that e-cigarette makers are not doing enough to stop teens from vaping after a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report showed the numb...
Cigarette smoking in U.S. reaches all-time low

Cigarette smoking in U.S. reaches all-time low

Health
Nov. 8 (UPI) -- Cigarette smoking has reached an all-time low among U.S. adults -- 14 percent -- according to new data released by the U.S. government. Experts and researchers say the new data is proof that efforts to decrease the rates of smoking in the United States have been successful, but they say there is still much more work to be done. An estimated 34 million adults in the United States smoked cigarettes either every day or some days in 2017, which is down from 15.5 percent of adults in 2016 and 67 percent fewer since 1965, according to data released by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute. The most dramatic cigarette usage decline was among adults aged 18 to 24 years -- 10.4 ...
'Don't go cold turkey' to quit smoking

'Don't go cold turkey' to quit smoking

Health
Smokers looking to quit as part of the annual Stoptober campaign are being warned not to go "cold turkey". Government health officials have said smokers stand a much greater chance of succeeding giving up by using official NHS support or turning to e-cigarettes.Research has shown only 4% of those who go "cold turkey" remain smoke-free after a year. But turning to nicotine replacement therapies, such as patches or lozenges, can increase that by 1.5 times.And getting help from an NHS stop-smoking clinic leads to a four-fold rise in the chances of succeeding, according to Public Health England. 'One smoke leads to daily habit for most' Quit smoking campaign backs e-cigs This year's Stoptober campaign will see the introduction of a free online personal quit p...
Child passive smoking 'increases chronic lung risk'

Child passive smoking 'increases chronic lung risk'

Health
Non-smoking adults have a higher risk of dying from serious lung disease if they grew up with parents who smoked, according to US research.The researchers said childhood passive smoking was "likely to add seven deaths to every 100,000 non-smoking adults dying annually".The study of 70,900 non-smoking men and women was led by the American Cancer Society.Experts said the best way to protect children was to quit smoking.If participants lived with a smoker during adulthood, there were other health implications, the study found.Smoke exposure of 10 or more hours every week increased their risk of death from ischemic heart disease by 27%, stroke by 23% and chronic obstructive lung disease by 42% compared to those who lived with non-smokers.The study was publish...