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Tag: snow

Where did Snow Patrol go for seven years? Gary Lightbody opens up

Where did Snow Patrol go for seven years? Gary Lightbody opens up

Entertainment
Gary Lightbody battled depression and alcoholism as Snow Patrol wrote their seventh album, Wildness. The band's frontman tells the BBC about overcoming his demons, how Nick Cave helped him conquer writer's block, and why he and Ed Sheeran want matching tattoos.Seven years. 2,555 days. That's how long it took Snow Patrol to make their new album.In the same time, you could have trained to be a doctor, launched a spacecraft to Saturn or filmed six series of Game of Thrones.But Gary Lightbody was engaged in a much more serious pursuit - conquering a life-threatening addiction to alcohol."I was relying on booze to get me through the day, every day" he recalls. "I'd started drinking on my own when I couldn't find anybody to go out with...
Continental growth spurt spurred Earth's first snow, study suggests

Continental growth spurt spurred Earth's first snow, study suggests

Science
May 25 (UPI) -- Scientists believe Earth's first snow fell some 2.4 billion years ago. According to a new study, the flurries arrived as a result of a continental growth spurt. The link between rising coastal elevations and the planet's first snowflakes -- detailed this week in the journal Nature -- was revealed by isotopic analysis of 278 shale samples, collected from all over the world. Shale, formed by the weathering of the planet's crust, is Earth's most abundant sedimentary rock. The chemical composition of shale samples can reveal details about its exposure to air, light and precipitation. "The process of forming shale captures organic products and eventually helps to generate oil," University of Oregon geologist Ilya Bindeman said in a news release. "Shales provide us with a conti...
NASA satellite spots Eastern Europe's orange snow

NASA satellite spots Eastern Europe's orange snow

Science
March 27 (UPI) -- It looks like a giant creamsicle melted across the mountains of Russia, Bulgaria, Romania and Ukraine.As evidenced by new NASA images, shared online this week, waves of wind-blown Saharan dust have turned the snowy peaks of Eastern Europe orange.Over the last week, dust storms in North Africa have kicked Saharan sands into the air and carried them across the Mediterranean. As they're carried by the cross-continental winds, the dust mixes with rain and snow before being dropped on Eastern Europe.The phenomenon, which happens once every few years, has made for some stunning photography, both on the ground and from space.Images captured by NASA's Aqua satellite show the orange peaks from a vantage of 436 miles.Let's block ads! (Why?) Science News - UPI.com
Orange-tinted snow makes ski resort look like Mars

Orange-tinted snow makes ski resort look like Mars

World
The snow that fell on a mountainous ski resort in Russia last week had an unusual hue -- and made the getaway destination look like a scene from Mars. The Rosa Khutor Resort in Sochi -- home to the 2014 Winter Olympics -- was covered in orange-tinted snow. The slopes, which looked more like desert dunes, made for some apocalyptic-looking photos, prompting people on social media to claim the photos had a sepia filter on them. Meteorologists say the reason behind the orange phenomenon is dust that blew into the atmosphere from the Sahara and Arabian Deserts to the south. It then made its way toward Russia. That dust in the atmosphere, mixed with the already forming snow, gave it the orange appearance, meteorologists added. Meanwhile, yesterday at Mount Elbrus, more than 100 miles from R...
Lose pay or face danger: Snow problem for couriers

Lose pay or face danger: Snow problem for couriers

Business
Gig economy workers are risking their safety in dangerous conditions because they fear losing a day's wages as snow and ice grip the UK.Bicycle couriers working in London told Sky News they must choose between missing pay or working in blizzard conditions.Jamie Ramstein said cycling through snowy days in his job as a medical courier was "non-stop risk" and sometimes "really dangerous".The 31-year-old added: "I had a taxi nearly knock me off my bike and an ambulance rush past me. My bike parts started to freeze... My vision was reduced by about 75%."On my way home I just started crying. It was so much emotion and relief.":: Workers' rights: Who is right?Image:Jamie Ramstein continued cycling despite the snowMr Ramstein said he loves his job, which he has had for four years, and that despite...