News That Matters

Tag: Social

Biden has promised to reform Social Security — some changes could come as soon as this year

Finance
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks about his administration's plans to fight the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic during a COVID-19 response event at the White House in Washington, January 21, 2021.Jonathan Ernst | ReutersNewly elected President Joe Biden has a tall list of priorities in his first days in office, with stemming the pandemic chief among them.But experts expect one issue he promised to deal with during his campaign, Social Security reform, could also become a focal point as soon as this year.Millions of Americans count on Social Security benefits to provide income when they are retired or disabled, or when loved ones pass away.The program's funds have been running low. The latest official estimate from the Social Security Administration shows that just 79% of promised ben...
Social media giants grilled on hate content

Social media giants grilled on hate content

Technology
.css-94m6rd-HeadingWrapper{border-bottom:solid 1px #BABABA;padding-bottom:1.5rem;}.css-94m6rd-HeadingWrapper > *:not([hidden]):not(style) ~ *:not([hidden]):not(style){margin-top:1rem;}.css-vk3nhx-ComponentWrapper{margin:1.5rem 0;}.css-2y05cd-StyledFigure{font-family:ReithSans,Helvetica,Arial,freesans,sans-serif;font-weight:400;font-size:0.875rem;line-height:1.125rem;}.css-kwaqyc-StyledFigureContainer{position:relative;}.css-1xtcmof-Placeholder{position:relative;display:block;padding-bottom:56.25%;background-color:#EEEEEE;}.css-1xtcmof-Placeholder img{overflow:hidden;position:absolute;top:0;right:0;bottom:0;left:0;display:-webkit-box;display:-webkit-flex;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;-webkit-box-pack:center;-webkit-justify-content:center;-ms-flex-pack:center;justify-content:center;-webki...
Extremists exploit a loophole in social moderation: Podcasts

Extremists exploit a loophole in social moderation: Podcasts

Technology
Major social platforms have been cracking down on the spread of misinformation and conspiracy theories in the leadup to the presidential election, and expanded their efforts in the wake of the Jan. 6 Capitol riot. But Apple and Google, among others, have left open a major loophole for this material: Podcasts.Podcasts made available by the two Big Tech companies let you tune into the world of the QAnon conspiracy theory, wallow in President Donald Trump's false claims of a stolen election and bask in other extremism. Accounts that have been banned on social media for election misinformation, threatening or bullying, and breaking other rules also still live on as podcasts available on the tech giants’ platforms.Conspiracy theorists have peddled stolen-election fantasies, coronavirus conspira
Mexican president mounts campaign against social media bans

Mexican president mounts campaign against social media bans

World
MEXICO CITY -- Mexico’s president vowed Thursday to lead an international effort to combat what he considers censorship by social media companies that have blocked or suspended the accounts of U.S. President Donald Trump.President Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s administration is reaching out to other government to form a common front on the issue.“I can tell you that at the first G20 meeting we have, I am going to make a proposal on this issue,” López Obrador said. “Yes, social media should not be used to incite violence and all that, but this cannot be used as a pretext to suspend freedom of expression.”“How can a company act as if it was all powerful, omnipotent, as a sort of Spanish Inquisition on what is expressed?” he asked.Foreign Relations Secretary Marcelo Ebrard said Mexico is star
Social networks explain why independent cultures interpret the world in similar ways

Social networks explain why independent cultures interpret the world in similar ways

Science
Jan. 13 (UPI) -- How can cultures that developed on opposite sides of the world come to similar understandings about colors, shapes, familial relationships and other categorical systems? The traditional explanation for this cross-cultural continuity is that humans are born with categories wired into their brains. Advertisement Researchers with the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, however, have an alternative explanation. It's not the human brain, exactly, that yields categorical consensus across disparate groups, researchers contend in a new paper, published in the journal Nature Communications, but the dynamics of consensus building among large groups of people. The phenomenon of "category convergence" has long been recognized by archaeologists in th...