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Tag: Social

Social media data needed for ‘harm’ research, say doctors

Social media data needed for ‘harm’ research, say doctors

Health
Leading UK psychiatrists say they will never understand the risks and benefits of social media use on children's mental health unless companies hand over their data to researchers.Tech companies must be made to share data and pay a tax to fund important research, they say in a report.There is growing evidence internet use can harm mental health but research is still lacking, it adds.But a civil rights group said children should not be treated "like lab rats".An independent regulator for online safety is planned by the government.The report, by the Royal College of Psychiatrists, calls on the regulator to require social-media companies to share data on how children and young people are using the likes of Instagram, Facebook and Tw...
Here’s how your Social Security cost-of-living adjustment is calculated – and what it could look like in 2021

Here’s how your Social Security cost-of-living adjustment is calculated – and what it could look like in 2021

Finance
People line up outside the Social Security Administration office in San Francisco.Getty ImagesIf you collect Social Security benefits, you're probably already eagerly waiting to see what your cost-of-living adjustment will be next year.New, early estimates from The Senior Citizens League, a nonpartisan senior group, point to a possible 1.5% COLA increase for 2021.In 2020, Social Security recipients got a 1.6% increase. For retired workers, that meant their average monthly benefit increased to $ 1,503 per month, up from $ 1,479 per month.Meanwhile, Social Security COLAs have averaged 1.4% in the past decade.How those adjustments are calculatedThe Social Security Administration generally announces its COLA in October for the following year.The amount is calculated based on the percentage cha...
Half of single seniors can’t pay for the basics. Here’s why Social Security’s not enough

Half of single seniors can’t pay for the basics. Here’s why Social Security’s not enough

Finance
Sam Edwards | Getty ImagesRetirement is often called the golden years. Many elderly Americans probably wouldn't describe it that way.Recent research from the Center for Social and Demographic Research on Aging at the University of Massachusetts Boston found that many older Americans don't have enough money to get by.The report estimates that 50% of adults age 65 and older who live alone, and 23% who live in two-elder households don't have enough money to cover their basic needs.Those individuals have incomes that are below a measure the researchers have developed called the Elder Index.The Elder Index measures the basic costs households face and how well they are able to meet those expenses. That includes food, housing, health care, transportation and other necessities. It does not cover e...
Pope Francis: Lack of access to healthcare is social justice issue

Pope Francis: Lack of access to healthcare is social justice issue

World
Jan. 3 (UPI) -- Pope Francis on Friday said governments and institutions should work to ensure everyone has access to healthcare. In a message for the World Day of the Sick, the pope said the lack of access to healthcare is a matter of social justice. "For this reason, I urge healthcare institutions and government leaders throughout the world not to neglect social justice out of a preoccupation for financial concerns," he said. In his address, the pope also encouraged the use of principles of "solidarity and subsidiarity" to ensure access to treatments that will preserve or restore health. Subsidiarity is a concept in Catholic thought that matters should be handled by the smallest or least central unit of social organization at which they will function. He also encouraged healthcare prof...
Poverty, lack of social mobility, government distrust contribute to U.S. gun violence

Poverty, lack of social mobility, government distrust contribute to U.S. gun violence

Health
Dec. 17 (UPI) -- Shooting incidents in the United States are often described as random acts of violence. However, a study published Tuesday in PLOS Medicine suggests otherwise, as the authors report that gun homicide rates are higher in areas in which poverty is high and the chances of working one's way up the socioeconomic ladder are low. "In disadvantaged communities, a lack of trust in institutions, such as police, to treat residents with respect may further lead residents to believe that the formal apparatus of social control is unjust, resulting in a greater willingness to take the law into their own hands," the author, Daniel Kim, an associate professor in the Bouvé College of Health Sciences at Northeastern University, wrote in the study. The Centers for Disease Control and Preven