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Tag: sounds

NASA’s offers ‘creepy’ playlist of space sounds for Halloween

NASA’s offers ‘creepy’ playlist of space sounds for Halloween

Science
ORLANDO, Fla., Oct. 30 (UPI) -- Marsquakes, the Milky Way and swirling gases on Jupiter are represented through sounds in a new NASA compilation, Sinister Sounds of the Solar System, released just in time for Halloween. The space agency and astronomy researchers have translated data from radio signals and other phenomena into audio tracks for many years, but the recent Halloween-themed release compiles such tracks like never before. Advertisement "The sounds you're hearing have been translated into something humans can hear and appreciate. They are not actually sounds that the universe emits, but a different way of appreciating the data NASA collects," said Kimberly Arcand, visualization and emerging technology lead for NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory space telescope. On NASA's new playl...
Rachelle Lefevre: ‘Sounds’ offers humanity, mystery and a reckoning

Rachelle Lefevre: ‘Sounds’ offers humanity, mystery and a reckoning

Entertainment
NEW YORK, Sept. 2 (UPI) -- Rachelle Lefevre said her new TV drama, The Sounds, helped her explore her philosophy that humanity is "beautifully broken." "I'm always interested in anything where characters have to pay the piper ... where the reckoning comes from all the things they tried to pretend they weren't," the actress told UPI in a recent phone interview. Advertisement The Sounds casts Lefevre as Maggie Cabbott, a Canadian woman whose husband Tom (Matt Whelan from Narcos) disappears during a boating trip in New Zealand, where he had been trying to set up a solo business venture outside the influence of his wealthy and unscrupulous family. The eight-episode drama begins streaming Thursday on Acorn TV. It co-stars Matt Nable, Peter Elliott, Emily Piggford, Vanessa Rare and Anna-Maree T...
Raghuram Rajan sounds a note of caution, says NPAs may see unprecedented rise in 6 months

Raghuram Rajan sounds a note of caution, says NPAs may see unprecedented rise in 6 months

Finance
NEW DELHI: Former RBI governor Raghuram Rajan on Tuesday said non-performing assets of the banking sector are likely to witness unprecedented increase in the next six months and the sooner the problem is recognised the better it would be. The outbreak of COVID-19 and subsequent lockdown to curb the spread of disease has hit businesses hard and many of them are facing difficulty in servicing debt. "The level of the NPAs is going to be unprecedented in six months from now if we really recognise the true level of NPAs...We are in trouble and sooner we recognise it, better it is because we really need to deal with the problem,” Rajan said during a session at the India Policy Forum 2020 organised by NCAER. Referring to the article titled Bold decisions, strong political will: Economic reforms a...
Coronavirus: Trump’s WHO de-funding ‘as dangerous as it sounds’

Coronavirus: Trump’s WHO de-funding ‘as dangerous as it sounds’

World
Media playback is unsupported on your device US President Donald Trump has been heavily criticised for halting funding for the World Health Organization (WHO) amid the global coronavirus pandemic.Philanthropist Bill Gates, a major funder of the WHO, said it was "as dangerous as it sounds".President Trump said on Tuesday that the body had "failed in its basic duty" in its response to coronavirus.The head of the WHO said it was reviewing the cuts' impact "to ensure our work continues uninterrupted"."We regret the decision of the President of the United States to order a halt in the funding to the WHO," Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said at a press conference, adding that the US has been "a long-standing and generous friend... and w...
Gadgets can be hacked to produce ‘dangerous’ sounds, says researcher

Gadgets can be hacked to produce ‘dangerous’ sounds, says researcher

Technology
Many modern gadgets can be hacked to produce deafening and disorienting sounds, research has revealed.Security researcher Matt Wixey found a range of devices had little protection to stop themselves being turned into "offensive" low-grade, cyber-weapons.Mr Wixey tested laptops, mobile phones, headphones, a PA system and several types of speakers. The weaknesses could cause physical harm, harass individuals or disrupt larger organisations, he said. Annoying tonesMr Wixey, who is a head of research at PWC's cyber-security practice, said he conducted the experiments as part of PhD work into the ways that malware can directly cause physical harm.He sought to find out if the volume and speaker controls of the devices could be manipula...