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Tag: space

Brexit sending UK space firms out of orbit

Brexit sending UK space firms out of orbit

Technology
UK companies are already starting to lose out on European space contracts as a result of Brexit, MPs have heard.Simon Henley, president-elect of the Royal Aeronautical Society - which represents professionals in the industry - said firms were missing out on bids on the Galileo satellite programme because it is funded by the European Union.Separately, the UK head of aviation giant Airbus - which builds wings for its aeroplanes in north Wales - told the Commons Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) committee that other countries were now "knocking at the door" for that business.MPs were taking evidence as part of an inquiry into the impact of Brexit on aerospace.It came as elsewhere, the Institute of Directors (IoD) added to voices from business warning that a transitional arrangem...
Stray plane forces last-minute space launch delay

Stray plane forces last-minute space launch delay

Technology
A space launch has been aborted just moments before lift-off after a small aircraft strayed into the rocket's hazard area.Commercial shipper Orbital ATK was within two minutes of launching its unmanned Antares rocket at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia when the aircraft appeared six miles offshore, flying at around 500ft.It prompted the postponement of the launch, which will now take place on Sunday morning.Orbital ATK's Antares rocket is set to carry a capsule holding 7,400 pounds of cargo to the International Space Station (ISS), supplying six astronauts with fresh fruit, vegetables, ice cream bars and equipment for experiments.Image:The rocket is raised into position at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in VirginiaThe cargo will help researchers conduct studies on how space's mic...
Rocket launch rescheduled after aircraft enters restricted space

Rocket launch rescheduled after aircraft enters restricted space

Science
Nov. 11 (UPI) -- Orbital OTK rescheduled Saturday's Antares rocket launch after another aircraft flew into restricted airspace near NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.The rocket was expected to carry the Cygnus aircraft into orbit and deliver 7,400 pounds of supplies, equipment and science experiments to the International Space Station.Within 2 minutes of the scheduled launch time of 7:37 a.m., Orbital OTK scrapped the launch saying a "small aircraft" was flying at about 500 feet some 6 miles offshore."We were working no issues until an aircraft flew into restricted airspace," the aerospace company said on Twitter. "We are currently de-tanking and will be ready to go tomorrow morning."Orbital OTK rescheduled the launch for 7:14 a.m. Sunday.Should skies remain clear, it was predicte...
Nasa carbon space observatory 'watches Earth breathe'

Nasa carbon space observatory 'watches Earth breathe'

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your deviceA Nasa satellite has provided remarkable new insights on how CO2 is moved through the Earth's atmosphere. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) tracked the behaviour of the gas in 2015/2016 - a period when the planet experienced a major El Niño event. This climate phenomenon boosts the amount of CO2 in the air. The US space agency's OCO satellite was able to show how that increase was controlled by the response of tropical forests to heat and drought. The forests' ability to draw down carbon dioxide, some of it produced by human activity, was severely curtailed. The science has significant implications because the kind of conditions associated with El Niños are expected to become much more common under global warming. "If future climate is more l
Scientists propose space shield to protect Earth from solar storms

Scientists propose space shield to protect Earth from solar storms

Science
Oct. 6 (UPI) -- If governments and their space agencies are serious about protecting Earth from solar storms, one team of researchers argues a giant space shield is the most logical solution.Much attention is paid to the threat of comets and asteroids. In the past, violent collisions have triggered mass extinctions. Solar storms -- intense waves of high energy particles flung into space during coronal mass ejection -- aren't so much a threat to life. But they could seriously damage satellites, electric grids, communications systems and a variety of modern technologies.When a massive geomagnetic solar storm struck Earth in 1859, the only observable effect was a spate of vibrant auroras. If a similarly powerful storm hit Earth today, the global economy could suffer losses totaling in the tri...