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Tag: species

Butterfly on a bomb range: Endangered Species Act at work

Technology
In the unlikely setting of the world’s most populated military installation, amid all the regimented chaos, you’ll find the Endangered Species Act at work. There, as a 400-pound explosive resounds in the distance, a tiny St. Francis Satyr butterfly flits among the splotchy leaves, ready to lay as many as 100 eggs. At one point, this brown and frankly dull-looking butterfly could be found in only one place on Earth: Fort Bragg’s artillery range. Now, thanks in great measure to the 46-year-old federal act, they are found in eight more places — though all of them are on other parts of the Army base. And if all goes well, biologists will have just seeded habitat No. 10. One of Earth’s rarest butterfly species, there are maybe 3,000 St. Francis Satyrs. There are never going to be enough of the
Parasitic wasp species that targets invasive stink bug named after Idris Elba

Parasitic wasp species that targets invasive stink bug named after Idris Elba

Science
Nov. 18 (UPI) -- Scientists have named a newly discovered parasitic wasp species after the actor Idris Elba. The species -- its scientific name, literally, Idris elba -- was found in Guanajuato, Mexico. The wasp parasitizes an invasive stink bug called the bagrada bug, a pest that causes major damage to cruciferous vegetables. Scientists described the new species this week in the Journal of Hymenoptera Research. The Idris genus was first described in 1856. Today, the genus includes more than 300 species. All other known Idris species infest the eggs of spiders. "This is the first association of an Idris species with a non-spider host, and the association is confirmed with molecular diagnostic tools that enable identification of parasitoid and host from the remains of parasitized eggs," ...
Deer-like species found in Vietnam after 30-year absence

Deer-like species found in Vietnam after 30-year absence

Science
Nov. 12 (UPI) -- With the help of camera traps, researchers have rediscovered a deer-like species called the silver-backed chevrotain in Vietnam. The species, Tragulus versicolor, sometimes called the Vietnamese mouse-deer, hadn't been seen since the 1990s. Scientists with Global Wildlife Conservation, the Southern Institute of Ecology and Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research announced the species' rediscovery this week in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution. "For so long this species has seemingly only existed as part of our imagination," An Nguyen, associate conservation scientist for GWC, said in a news release. "Discovering that it is, indeed, still out there, is the first step in ensuring we don't lose it again, and we're moving quickly now to figure out how best to ...
Scientists find seven new leech species that live inside freshwater mussels

Scientists find seven new leech species that live inside freshwater mussels

Science
Nov. 11 (UPI) -- If you eat freshwater mussels, you might open a shell to find one of seven newly named leech species. Yummy. Between 2002 and 2018, Arthur Bogan, research curator of mollusks at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, recruited collaborators from all over the globe to collect freshwater mussels, sample DNA and document what they found inside. The project revealed seven new species of leeches. According to Ivan N. Bolotov, scientist of the Federal Center for Integrated Arctic Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences and one of Bogan's collaborators, at least two of the species should be classified as obligate inhabitants of the freshwater mussel's mantle cavity. These species cannot complete their life cycle without their bivalve host. "It has been suggested tha...
‘One million volunteers needed to tackle invasive non-native species’

‘One million volunteers needed to tackle invasive non-native species’

Technology
One million volunteers are needed to tackle the growing threat posed by invasive non-native species such as giant hogweed which are costing the economy £1.7bn a year, MPs have said.Between 36 and 48 new invasive species will become established in the next two decades in Britain - and slowing the rate of their arrival is key to preventing their establishment, a report by the Environmental Audit Committee said. Invasive non-native species (Inns) are species directly moved as a result of human activity, and include non-native deer which attract ticks carrying Lyme disease and Oak Processionary Moth Caterpillars that have caused ash dieback, predicted to kill half of the UK's ash trees within 50 years - costing £15bn.Giant hogweed, which causes skin rashes and blistering and the Asian hornet w