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Watch: LaMelo Ball drains half-court shot in front of Michigan State's Tom Izzo

Watch: LaMelo Ball drains half-court shot in front of Michigan State's Tom Izzo

Sports
Jan. 16 (UPI) -- LaMelo Ball put an exclamation point on SPIRE Institute's win against Brush High School by draining a half-court shot in the final seconds. The youngest Ball brother was dribbling down the court with about 10 seconds remaining as his team held a 79-61 advantage. He eyed the rim before heaving up a shot and draining it in front of his defender. Michigan State coach Tom Izzo was in attendance during SPIRE's 82-61 triumph on Tuesday in Lyndhurst, Ohio. Ball finished the game with 22 points, eight rebounds and six assists. This isn't the first time Ball has shown off his range in a game. In 2016 he pointed to a spot on the floor during a game before rising up and drilling another half-court heave when he played for Chino Hills. [embedded content] Ball was previously committed...
Ecologists: Alaska wildlife management threatens state's largest carnivores

Ecologists: Alaska wildlife management threatens state's largest carnivores

Science
Jan. 15 (UPI) -- Alaska's wildlife management plan puts the state's largest carnivores, wolves and bears, at risk, according to a group of ecologists at Oregon State University. In a new paper published in the journal PLOS Biology, ecologists argue the state's management plan privileges moose, caribou and deer over carnivores. By depressing carnivore numbers, wildlife managers can ensure moose, caribou and deer populations balloon -- a boon for hunters. "Gray wolves, brown bears and black bears are managed in most of Alaska in ways designed to significantly lower their numbers," William Ripple, distinguished professor of ecology at Oregon State's College of Forestry, said in a news release. "Alaska is unique in the world because these management priorities are both widespread and legally ...
Dig resurrects a feud over which town is a state's oldest

Dig resurrects a feud over which town is a state's oldest

Technology
An archaeological dig is rekindling a feud between two towns over which was the first in Connecticut. Experts have unearthed artifacts they believe date to the 1630s in Wethersfield, where town signs declare it the state's "most ancient," founded in 1634. But a few miles up the Connecticut River to the north, Windsor boasts it is the state's "first town," settled in 1633. The long-running dispute on which was the first English settlement in Connecticut centers on how you define "town." Settlers from Plymouth, Massachusetts, established a trading post in Windsor in 1633. Advocates for Wethersfield say settlers from Watertown, Massachusetts, made Wethersfield their home in 1634 and claim Windsor didn't become a town until 1635, when people there built homes. "I don't think it ever will be ...
California wildfires: Trump visits state's deadliest blaze

California wildfires: Trump visits state's deadliest blaze

World
Media playback is unsupported on your device US President Donald Trump has visited California to survey the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in the state's history.The Camp Fire, in northern California, has killed at least 76 people.More than 1,200 people have been reported missing, although officials say that figure could fluctuate.In the destroyed town of Paradise, Mr Trump described the scene as "sad" and reiterated his disputed claim that poor forest management was to blame."We do have to do management maintenance and we'll be working also with environmental groups. I think everyone's seen the light," he said."I don't think we'll have this again to this extent," he added.Experts have pointed to the weather, climate change and popula...
California fires: At least 42 die in state's deadliest wildfire

California fires: At least 42 die in state's deadliest wildfire

World
Media playback is unsupported on your device Thirteen more bodies have been recovered in California, bringing the death toll in the US state's deadliest wildfire to 42, officials say.The remains were found in and around the largely incinerated town of Paradise, in the north of the state.At least 228 people are missing as the Camp Fire continues to rage. Nearly 7,200 structures have been destroyed, and another 15,500 are at risk.The fire has now surpassed the 1933 Griffith Park disaster that killed 31.Speaking at a news conference on Monday evening, Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea confirmed the number of dead, and the official number of missing.Many more people are said to be unaccounted for. In the south of the state, other wildfires are menac...