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Tag: strategy

Army culture, strategy need to transform for 21st century, Gen. James McConville says

Army culture, strategy need to transform for 21st century, Gen. James McConville says

Business
The Army is fighting institutionalized racism and needs to see troops as individuals with distinct experiences instead of as a homogeneous unit, Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville said Friday. The Army doesn't have a problem with diversity, but inclusion, McConville said at a Center for Strategic and International Studies event. Advertisement The service branch is already relatively diverse -- the Army is 39% minority, while only 24% of the country is minority. But diversity drops off in higher ranks; 71% of officers are white. In addition to the Army's overt efforts to combat racism, such as effectively banning Confederate flags, promotion boards no longer see photos of candidates to prevent implicit bias, he said. The Air Force has also been discussing race and diversity this su...
Pentagon maps out defense space strategy

Pentagon maps out defense space strategy

Business
June 19 (UPI) -- The Pentagon's strategy for defense in space treats the environment as a warfighting domain, a Defense Department report says. The Defense Space Strategy calls for maintenance of space superiority, support to national, joint and combined operations on earth,and assurance of space stability, the Pentagon said this week. Advertisement The report identified what officials call four priority lines of effort: building a comprehensive military advantage in space; integration of power in space into the military; shaping the strategic environment; and cooperation with allies, partners, and other U.S. government departments and agencies. The 18-page unclassified section of the report was released on Wednesday. "China and Russia have weaponized space and turned it into a war-fighti...
Sweden determined it has smarter strategy for dealing with COVID-19

Sweden determined it has smarter strategy for dealing with COVID-19

World
Stockholm is a world away from the lockdowns affecting the rest of Europe.The streets are quieter than normal, but there are still plenty of people about. In the King's Gardens they stroll in the spring sunshine, breaking the conventions on social distancing as they huddle together for a selfie beneath the cherry blossom. Sweden is aiming for herd immunity, where around 60% of a population catches an illness By t...
Coronavirus: Scientists say UK virus strategy is ‘risking lives’

Coronavirus: Scientists say UK virus strategy is ‘risking lives’

Health
Hundreds of scientists have written to the government urging them to introduce tougher measures to tackle the spread of Covid-19.In an open letter, a group of 229 scientists from UK universities say the government's current approach will put the NHS under additional stress and "risk many more lives than necessary".The signatories also criticised comments made by Sir Patrick Vallance, the government's chief scientific adviser, about managing the spread of the infection to make the population immune.The Department of Health said Sir Patrick's comments had been misinterpreted.In their letter the scientists also questioned the government's view that people will become fed up with restrictions if they were imposed too soon. Their lett...
Genome editing strategy could give rice, other crops nutritional boost

Genome editing strategy could give rice, other crops nutritional boost

Science
March 5 (UPI) -- Scientists have developed a new genome engineering strategy for boosting the levels of beta carotene, the precursor of vitamin A, in rice. The novel CRISPR technology method, described this week in the journal Nature Communications, could help plant scientists engineer healthier, more robust crops. Typically, genetic engineers use a special bacterium to transfer beta carotene-producing genes into the rice genome, but the technique is imprecise. Transgenes can end up in unwanted locations in the genome, compromising the plant's health and reducing yields. Scientists at the University of California Davis came up with a better way. "We used CRISPR to precisely target those genes onto genomic safe harbors, or chromosomal regions that we know won't cause any adverse effects ...