News That Matters

Tag: student

This company is helping pay down its employees’ student debt. ‘They are creating value for us’

This company is helping pay down its employees’ student debt. ‘They are creating value for us’

Finance
Chegg has a new plan to help its employees deal with their student loans.And its CEO wants other companies to follow Chegg's lead.The student-connected learning platform announced a new program Thursday that will give its entry- through manager-level workers up to $ 5,000 a year, if they have been with the company at least two years. Director- or vice president-level employees can get up to $ 3,000 annually to help pay down their student loan debt. "Corporations need to play a role here," Chegg CEO Dan Rosensweig told CNBC's "Closing Bell " on Thursday. "We are the beneficiaries of those people who have gotten an education — doesn't matter if it is four year or two year or even if they completed it," he added. "If they borrowed money and they are creating value for us, we want to help the
This company wants to help shave $6,200 off your student loans

This company wants to help shave $6,200 off your student loans

Finance
Dan Kitwood | Getty ImagesWhen Michael Bloch's wife graduated from law school with more than $ 300,000 in student loans, the couple sat down to come up with a plan.After reading blogs and articles, drafting spreadsheets and consulting a financial advisor, they still didn't have an answer. "We really struggled with what is the right way to pay those loans back," Bloch said. "We found that there is no easy way to figure out what is the right thing for an individual to do."The dilemma inspired Bloch to drop out of Stanford Business School, where he would have racked up another $ 250,000 in student loans, to help others who are confronting the same problem.About 44.7 million Americans had student loan debt, which totaled $ 1.47 trillion, at the end of 2018, according to the Federal Reserve Ban...
He moved to a jungle in India to escape his giant student debt — and he’s not alone

He moved to a jungle in India to escape his giant student debt — and he’s not alone

Finance
Chadd Haag said he left the United States to escape his student debt. Now he lives in India.Source: Chadd HaagChad Haag considered living in a cave to escape his student debt. He had a friend doing it. But after some plotting, he settled on what he considered a less risky plan. This year, he relocated to a jungle in India. "I've put America behind me," Haag, 29, said.Today he lives in a concrete house in the village of Uchakkada for $ 50 a month. His backyard is filled with coconut trees and chickens. "I saw four elephants just yesterday," he said, adding that he hopes never to set foot in a Walmart again.More than 9,000 miles away from Colorado, Haag said, his student loans don't feel real anymore. "It's kind of like, if a tree falls in the woods and no one hears it, does it really exi...
This trivia app cancels your student debt. One woman just won $50,000

This trivia app cancels your student debt. One woman just won $50,000

Finance
Cynthia Thomas Reher is a veterinarian in Bellevue, WashingtonSource: Cynthia Thomas ReherWhere did the actor Steve McQueen live as a child? Does brackish water have more freshwater than saltwater?If you can correctly answer questions like these, you might be done with your student loans sooner than you expected.Some 400,000 people have registered with Givling, a trivia app that is helping people pay off their student debt, said Seth Beard, Givling's chief marketing officer. People are tested in pop culture, history, geography, math, chemistry and more. Users play rounds of trivia on teams of three and prizes are given out weekly.The company was founded around four years ago, but it's taken off over the last year, Beard said. More than 5,000 people have won prizes on the app, he said,...
Student loan borrowers with cancer are supposed to get a break. They’re still waiting

Student loan borrowers with cancer are supposed to get a break. They’re still waiting

Finance
On Sept. 28, 2018, President Donald Trump signed into law a bill allowing people with cancer to put their student loan payments on hold. The rollout of the new program has been rocky. The Education Department, in a notice in the Federal Register, writes: "The law was immediately effective, meaning that borrowers can immediately request and, if eligible, should receive the deferment." That's not happening. Cancer patients with student debt hoping to get this new break from their monthly bills are running into a wall. At issue seems...