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Y chromosome may expose men to greater cancer risk, study finds

Y chromosome may expose men to greater cancer risk, study finds

Health
Jan. 17 (UPI) -- DNA differences between men and women may explain why cancer risk is higher in males, a new study by researchers at the Barcelona Institute for Global Health suggests. In findings published Friday in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, the authors report that loss of function in certain genes of the sex-determining Y chromosome, which is present only in men, may cause them to have an elevated risk for cancer. A landmark 2011 study found that men are up to five times more likely to receive a cancer diagnosis than women. "Men are not only at higher risk of cancer than women, they also face a worse prognosis," co-author of the new study, Juan Ramón González, coordinator of the study and head of the Bioinformatic Group in Genetic Epidemiology at ISGlobal, said in a
Study pinpoints the timing of earliest human migration

Study pinpoints the timing of earliest human migration

Science
Jan. 10 (UPI) -- Sangiran, a World Heritage archeological site on the island of Java, is home to dozens of hominin fossils, comprising three different species, including evidence of the earliest hominid migration to Southeast Asia. Until now, scientists have struggled to figure out the precise timing of the hominin migrations that populated Java. New estimates, based on a unique fossil dating survey, suggest Homo erectus, the most successful archaic human, first arrived at Sangiran between between 1.3 and 1.5 million years ago -- some 300,000 years later than previous estimates. Sangiran is one of the most important hominin fossil sites in Southeast Asia, but the site's uncertain chronology has made it hard for scientists to understand the movement of early humans across the region. To m...
Study: Roughly 10% of U.S. children receive unnecessary medical care

Study: Roughly 10% of U.S. children receive unnecessary medical care

Health
Jan. 7 (UPI) -- Roughly one in 10 American children receive unnecessary healthcare services, driving up costs and exposing them to potential side effects, a new analysis suggests. An analysis of medical data for 8.6 million publicly and privately insured children in 12 states, published Tuesday in the journal Pediatrics, suggests young people receive diagnostic tests, imaging tests and prescription drugs they ultimately don't need. Many were treated for conditions, like acute sinus infections, they didn't have and were given antibiotics for colds, which is considered inappropriate according to most care guidelines. Part of the issue may be a fear of missing something, on the part of both doctors and parents, researchers say. "There are steps that parents can take to minimize the possibi...
Study links diabetes to increased risk for heart failure

Study links diabetes to increased risk for heart failure

Health
Jan. 2 (UPI) -- As if diabetes didn't present enough health complications on its own, researchers at the Mayo Clinic now believe those with the disease are at increased risk for heart failure. In findings published Thursday in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researchers identified diabetes as an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure. In the population study, the risk for heart failure was nearly twice as high in people with the disease compared with healthy controls. "Diabetes mellitus alone is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure," study senior author Horng Chen, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, said in a press release. "There is still much to learn and study in terms of this association and how to best dia...
Study measures river ice loss caused by global warming

Study measures river ice loss caused by global warming

Science
Jan. 1 (UPI) -- Many communities and industries utilize frozen rivers for transportation purposes during the heart of the winter, but new research suggests the planet's rivers are likely to spend fewer and fewer days frozen solid each year as temperatures continue to rise. In addition to supporting transportation networks, frozen rivers also curb the release of carbon dioxide from freshwater into the atmosphere. But just like glaciers, ice sheets, sea ice and frozen tundra, frozen rivers are vulnerable to accelerated melt rates. To find out how river ice is being affected globally by climate change, scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill compiled and analyzed nearly half a million satellite images of major rivers of the last three-plus decades. "We used more than 4...