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Tag: study

Trial launched to study HIV-to-HIV liver transplant outcomes

Trial launched to study HIV-to-HIV liver transplant outcomes

Health
Feb. 15 (UPI) -- The country's first large-scale clinical trial to study the safety of liver transplants between people with HIV was launched on Thursday. The new study -- sponsored by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which is part of the National Institutes of Health -- will track the success of 80 liver transplants to HIV-positive people. Half of the livers will come from deceased HIV-positive donors and the other half will come from deceased HIV-negative donors. This research comes after a 2018 study that similarly evaluated HIV-to-HIV kidney transplants. Until the passage of the HIV Organ Policy Equity Act in 2013, liver transplants from an HIV-positive donor to an HIV-positive recipient were not legal in the U.S. This drove the demand for HIV-positive people wit...
Hip and knee replacements show high durability, study shows

Hip and knee replacements show high durability, study shows

Health
Feb. 15 (UPI) -- Most hip replacements last well after the surgery was performed, a new study says. About six in 10 hip replacements performed 25 years ago have remained in place, according to a new study published Thursday in The Lancet. Additionally, 89 percent were still in place 15 years later and 70 percent lasted 20 years. "Over two million hip and knee replacements have been performed in the UK since 2003 and patients often ask clinicians how long their hip or knee replacement will last, but until now, we have not had a generalizable answer," Jonathan Evans, a researcher at the Bristol Medical School and study lead author, said in a news release. This new research also shows that durability comes along with knee replacement surgery. About 90 percent of total knee replacements and 7...
Study: Chemical in Roundup may increase cancer risk by 40 percent

Study: Chemical in Roundup may increase cancer risk by 40 percent

Health
Feb. 15 (UPI) -- Glyphosate, a chemical in the popular weedkiller Roundup, may elevate cancer risk in people, according to a new study. Researchers examined studies conducted between 2001 and 2018 and found that the chemical could increase the risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma by up to more than 41 percent, according to new findings published this month in Science Direct. "Our analysis focused on providing the best possible answer to the question of whether or not glyphosate is carcinogenic," senior author Lianne Sheppard, a professor at the University of Washingtonsaid in a press release. "As a result of this research, I am even more convinced that it is." This new study contradicts a past report from the European Food Safety Authority that said glyphosate does not cause cancer. The United N...
Scientists use spacecraft's measurements to study solar wind heating

Scientists use spacecraft's measurements to study solar wind heating

Science
Feb. 14 (UPI) -- With the help of a NASA spacecraft, astrophysicists have uncovered the process by which energy is transferred between electromagnetic fields and plasma in space. Most of the visible matter in the universe exists in the form of plasma, an ionized state of matter. Understanding how energy is transferred to and from ionized particles in space can help scientists to better understand a variety of cosmological phenomena. The transfer of energy from electromagnetic turbulence in space to the electrons in the solar wind is caused by a process known as Landau damping. When electromagnetic waves travel through plasma and the plasma particles themselves are traveling at the same speeds, the plasma particles absorb the wave's energy, reducing -- or damping -- the electromagnetic wav...
Study: Greenland could sell its sand, profit from melting glaciers

Study: Greenland could sell its sand, profit from melting glaciers

Science
Feb. 11 (UPI) -- As Greenland's glaciers continue to melt at an accelerated pace, meltwater rivers are depositing more and more sediment along the island's coast. If the trend continues, as most climate scientists predict, Greenland could stand to profit from warming temperatures by selling its excess sand. "Eight percent of the annual sediment contribution delivered to the global oceans comes from the Greenland Ice Sheet and with continued global warming, this number is expected to increase," Mette Bendixen, a researcher at the University of Colorado, Boulder's Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, said in a news release. Like Greenland's glaciers, the island's economy -- mostly based around commercial fishing -- is increasingly vulnerable. Selling excess sand could provide local comm...