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Study: High concentrations of heavy metals found in baby foods

Study: High concentrations of heavy metals found in baby foods

Health
Aug. 17 (UPI) -- Two-thirds of the baby foods tested by Consumer Reports had a troubling cadmium, inorganic arsenic or lead content, a study by the review company showed. The non-governmental organization tested 50 brand name baby foods and found "worrisome" levels of heavy metals in 68 percent of those tested. Ingesting the metals can, over time, impair cognitive function in babies and children. Cadmium, arsenic and lead are regarded, with mercury, as the most harmful to health. The report said every product tested had a measurable level of at least one heavy metal, and 15 of the 50 tested could pose health risks to a child regularly eating just one serving per day. The study also noted foods containing rice or sweet potatoes were especially likely to have high metal levels, and organic...
Type 2 diabetics can reduce risk for cardiovascular disease, study says

Type 2 diabetics can reduce risk for cardiovascular disease, study says

Health
Aug. 16 (UPI) -- People with type 2 diabetes can significantly reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease with proper treatment and not smoking, according to a study in Sweden. In a study published Thursday in The New England Journal of Medicine, researchers at University of Gothenburg in Sweden said the increased risks could be theoretically eliminated. "This is definitely good news. The study shows that patients with type 2 diabetes with all risk factors within therapeutic target range had an extremely low risk of premature death, heart attack and stroke," author Aidin Rawshani, a doctoral student at the Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, said in a press release. Risk factors that can be controlled by medication, and cigarette abstinence, are blood pressure, long-term blood gl...
Paleontologists study rare pterosaur fossils using a 3D model

Paleontologists study rare pterosaur fossils using a 3D model

Technology
Paleontologists have found rare winged-reptile fossils, and 3D technology has helped them to study the pterosaur in "exquisite" detail. The site was discovered by paleontologists while they were looking for fossil tracks in the rugged desert of northeastern Utah, not far from the dinosaur national monument, according to Brooks Britt, a professor at Brigham Young University (BYU). While pulling themselves over a sandstone ledge adjacent to a precarious cliff the researchers saw delicate bones in the rock at the site known as Saints and Sinners, which was excavated over a period of several years, according to Britt who's studying the fossils. The bones belong to the pterosaur, or winged reptile, which is named Caelestiventus hanseni, according to Britt. This particular species isn't a bi...
Study: Cetuximab, radiation inferior to standard HPV throat cancer treatment

Study: Cetuximab, radiation inferior to standard HPV throat cancer treatment

Health
Aug. 14 (UPI) -- Treating HPV-positive throat cancer with cetuximab and radiation had worse overall and progression-free survival results compared with the current method of treatment with radiation and cisplatin, the National Institutes of Health revealed Tuesday. The trial, which was funded by the National Cancer Institute, was intended to test whether the combination would be less toxic than cisplatin but be just as effective for human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal cancer. The trial, which began in 2011, enrolled 849 patients at least 18 years old with the cancer to receive cetuximab or cisplatin with radiation. The trial is expected to finish in 2020. Cetuximab, which is manufactured under the brand name Erbitux by Eli Lilly, and cisplatin, which as sold as Platinol by Pfizer,...
Study reveals how zebra fish get their stripes

Study reveals how zebra fish get their stripes

Science
Aug. 13 (UPI) -- Every zebra fish begins life as a transparent embryo. Almost all of them end up with stripes. Now, researchers know why. Scientists at Ohio State University developed a mathematical model that describes the organization of the zebra fish's three types of pigment cells. "It's amazing that you have these individual cells that can sort themselves into these reliable patterns," Alexandria Volkening, a postdoctoral fellow at Ohio State's Mathematical Biosciences Institute, said in a news release. "The cells move around on the skin to create stripes. It's like individual birds that know how to flock together and fly in formation." The research, published this week in the journal Nature Communications, suggests the pigment cell sorting process is orchestrated by iridophores. Th...