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Tag: study

Cells and their genes continue to function after death, study proves

Cells and their genes continue to function after death, study proves

Science
Feb. 13 (UPI) -- Even after you die, your body's cells will continue to function. According to a new study published in the journal Nature Communications, the body's cells host post-mortem genetic expression for 24 to 48 hours.All of the biological functions that make life possible are powered by our genes -- and specifically, the expression of those genes. Recently, an international team of scientists observed genetic activity in post-mortem cells.Genes and genetic activity are defined by two types of code, DNA and RNA. DNA are the instructions, while RNA acts as the interpreter. RNA "expresses" the DNA, reading the code and translating it into action -- or biological functions.When humans suffer diseases, it is often caused by a disruption of the genetic translation and expression proces...
Memory problems predict Alzheimer's onset, study says

Memory problems predict Alzheimer's onset, study says

Health
Feb. 15 (UPI) -- Individuals who are not aware of their own memory problems are nearly three times more likely to develop some form of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, within two years, according to research at McGill University in Montreal.In a study published Thursday in the journal Neurology, a team from McGill's Translational Neuroimaging Laboratory studied individuals who experience memory lapses. The study was led by Dr. Pedro Rosa-Neto, co-senior author of the study and clinician scientist and director of the McGill Center for Studies in Aging."This study could provide clinicians with insights regarding clinical progression to dementia," Rosa-Neto said in a press release.Anosognosia, frequently referred to as a lack of insight, is a common symptom of certain mental illnesses...
Study: Prazosin fails to alleviate PTSD in military veterans

Study: Prazosin fails to alleviate PTSD in military veterans

Health
Feb. 8 (UPI) -- The drug prazosin failed to effectively alleviate post-traumatic stress disorder in military veterans, according to a trial conducted by researchers with the Department of Veterans Affairs.Although the drug has been effective in controlling nightmares or improving sleep quality associated with PTSD, the researchers concluded it was no better than a placebo, according to results published in The New England Journal of Medicine. Prazosin, which includes trade names Minipress, Vasoflex, Lentopres and Hypovase, is also used to treat high blood pressure and anxiety.About 11 percent to 20 percent of veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars have been diagnosed with PTSD, according to the activist group DoSomething.org.Dr. Murray Raskind, a lead researcher on the trial, told Stat ...
UV light can kill airborne flu virus, study finds

UV light can kill airborne flu virus, study finds

Science
Feb. 9 (UPI) -- Experiments prove low doses of far ultraviolet C light, or far-UVC light, can wipe out airborne flu virus without harming humans.Researchers at the Columbia University Irving Medical Center suggest far-UVC lamps should be installed in hospitals, doctors offices, schools, airports and other public places.Currently, ultraviolet light is used to decontaminate surgical equipment, but the light isn't safe for human exposure."Unfortunately, conventional germicidal UV light... can lead to skin cancer and cataracts, which prevents its use in public spaces," David J. Brenner, a professor of radiation biophysics and director of the Center for Radiological Research at CUIMC, said in a news release.Traditional UV lamps feature a broad spectrum of light wavelengths between 200 to 400 na...
Study: Vitamin B3 variant could help Alzheimer's patients

Study: Vitamin B3 variant could help Alzheimer's patients

Health
Feb. 7 (UPI) -- A form of Vitamin B3 improved cognitive and physical function in mice with Alzheimer's disease-like symptoms in experiments, the National Institutes of Health report in a new study.The effects of the supplement nicotinamide riboside, a form of Vitamin B3, when given to mice suggests a new method for treating Alzheimer's disease, researchers at the National Institute on Aging, a NIH agency, reported on Tuesday.In Alzheimer's disease, the brain's usual DNA repair activity is impaired, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction, lower neuron production and increased neuronal dysfunction and inflammation. Nicotinamide riboside, or NR, normalizes levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a metabolite vital to cellular energy, stem cell self-renewal, resistance to neuronal stress an...