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Florida Current study confirms decline in strength of Gulf Stream

Florida Current study confirms decline in strength of Gulf Stream

Science
Aug. 7 (UPI) -- New research suggests the strength of the Florida Current, which forms the beginning of the Gulf Stream, has weakened considerably over the last century. The findings, published Friday in the journal Nature Climate Change, corroborate the predictions of several models that suggest the Gulf Stream has slowed over the last several decades. Advertisement The Florida Current is a thermal ocean current that flows from west to east around the tip of Florida, joining the Gulf Stream off Florida's east coast. Scientists have been tracking the strength of the Florida Current since the early 1980s -- not long enough to identify multi-decadal or centennial trends. To better understand the current's historical changes, Christopher Piecuch, researcher at the Woods Hole Oceanographic I...
Study: Topical minoxidil reverses hair loss caused by radiation for brain, head, neck cancers

Study: Topical minoxidil reverses hair loss caused by radiation for brain, head, neck cancers

Health
Aug. 5 (UPI) -- Treatment with topical minoxidil helps restore hair loss caused by radiation treatment for brain tumors and other head and neck cancers, a study published Wednesday by JAMA Dermatology found. Twenty-eight of 34 patients treated with the drug after radiation therapy experienced hair regrowth in as little as three weeks, researchers said. Advertisement Minoxidil is an over-the-counter medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for hair regrowth in men and women. The patients suffered from persistent radiation-induced alopecia, or hair loss, as a result of cancer treatment, the researchers said. The hair loss from radiation is "a dose-dependent phenomenon," and was linked specifically to higher doses of radiation applied to the scalp, researchers at Memoria...
Study: Post-op delirium in seniors causes longer hospital stays, higher costs

Study: Post-op delirium in seniors causes longer hospital stays, higher costs

Health
July 31 (UPI) -- Older adults who develop brain dysfunction after surgery spend more time in the hospital and are less likely to be discharged home, a study published Friday by JAMA Network Open found. Seniors who experience delirium during recovery from an operation are hospitalized for up to two days longer and, when they are discharged, up to 78% are sent to a rehabilitation or skilled nursing facility, according to the researchers. Advertisement As a result, they can incur more than $ 17,000 in additional healthcare costs, the researchers said. "There is increased awareness of these disorders in the medical community and, interestingly, among patients and their families," study co-author Dr. M. Dustin Boone told UPI. "Many factors drive this, [including] older age, lower socioeconomi...
COVID-19 risk 3 times higher for front-line health workers as than public, study finds

COVID-19 risk 3 times higher for front-line health workers as than public, study finds

Health
July 31 (UPI) -- Front-line healthcare workers in the United States and Britain were more than three times as likely to report a positive COVID-19 test during the first few weeks of the pandemic, an analysis published Friday by The Lancet Public Health found. The findings are based on self-reported data from nearly 100,000 American and British clinicians using the COVID Symptom Study smartphone app, recorded between March 24 and April 23, according to the researchers. Advertisement Preliminary results also suggest that healthcare workers' ethnic background and clinical setting, as well as the availability of personal protective equipment, or PPE, were important factors in their likelihood of testing positive for COVID-19, the researchers said. "Previous reports from public health authorit...
Genetic impact of African slave trade revealed in DNA study

Genetic impact of African slave trade revealed in DNA study

Science
A major DNA study has shed new light on the fate of millions of Africans who were traded as slaves to the Americas between the 16th and 19th centuries.More than 50,000 people took part in the study, which was able to identify more details of the "genetic impact" the trade has had on present-day populations in the Americas.It lays bare the consequences of rape, maltreatment, disease and racism.More than 12.5m Africans were traded between 1515 and the mid-19th Century.Some two million of the enslaved men, women and children died en route to the Americas. Searching for my slave roots Moving to Ghana 'to escape racism' The DNA study was led by consumer genetics company 23andMe and included 30,000 people of African ancestry on both si...