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Study: People favor products with more reviews, regardless of what reviews say

Study: People favor products with more reviews, regardless of what reviews say

Science
Aug. 21 (UPI) -- New research suggests that consumers use reviews and ratings by other consumers to drive their purchasing decision-making.The study, published today in Psychological Science, found that people favor products that have more reviews, even if they have lower ratings than an alternative product."It's extremely common for websites and apps to display the average score of a product along with the number of reviews. Our research suggests that, in some cases, people might take this information and make systematically bad decisions with it," Derek Powell, a researcher at Stanford University, said in a press release."We found that people were biased toward choosing to purchase more popular products and that this sometimes led them to make very poor decisions."Researchers studied act...
Study suggests you cannot be 'fat but fit'

Study suggests you cannot be 'fat but fit'

Health
A new study published in the European Heart Journal Monday finds that being overweight increases your risk of coronary heart disease, even if you are otherwise considered healthy, destabilizing the common conception that someone can be "fat but fit." "Our findings suggest that if a patient is overweight or obese, all efforts should be made to help them get back to a healthy weight, regardless of other factors. Even if their blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol appear within the normal range, excess weight is still a risk factor," Dr. Camille Lassale, the lead author of the study said in a statement to the Imperial College London announcing the findings. Researchers analyzed thousands of incidences of coronary heart disease over a more than 12-year period in 10 countries in Europe...
NASA, students to study eclipse with high-altitude balloons

NASA, students to study eclipse with high-altitude balloons

Science
Aug. 16 (UPI) -- Not everyone will be watching next week's eclipse from ground level. As part of the Eclipse Ballooning Project, some 50 high-altitude balloons launched from 20 locations will offer a view of the phenomenon from the edge of space.For those in the path of Monday's total solar eclipse, the star attraction will be skyward. Necks will be craned as moon's path intercepts the sun and casts a shadow stretching 70 miles across.Thanks to the cameras and live-streaming technology installed on most of the balloons' payloads, online viewers will be able to look down on the eclipse."The focus of the live stream will really be on the shadow," said Angela Des Jardins of Montana State University.The project, which includes dozens of student research teams from colleges and universities acr...
Herpesvirus study leads to discovery of broad-spectrum antiviral

Herpesvirus study leads to discovery of broad-spectrum antiviral

Health
Aug. 15 (UPI) -- A study in mice by the National Institutes of Health has uncovered a potential broad-spectrum antiviral that may be effective against herpesvirus.Two-thirds of the world's population are infected with HSV-1 and roughly 500 million have HSV-2, according to the World Health Organization.When a person is infected with the herpes simplex virus, or HSV, the virus can persist in the body in a latent form, which can reactivate, causing recurrent infection.HSV can cause a variety of diseases, including oral cold sores, genital lesions, serious eye conditions and blindness.Recurrent HSV can lead to ocular HSV infections causing corneal scarring, and neonatal infections can lead to developmental delays, neurological issues and death. People infected with HSV are also at an increased...
New study links C-sections with hysterectomy complications later in life

New study links C-sections with hysterectomy complications later in life

Health
A new study found that women who undergo a cesarean section delivery may have an increased risk of complications when undergoing a hysterectomy later in life. Women who have undergone one cesarean delivery had a 31.1 percent increased risk of re-operation after a hysterectomy later in life, when compared with women having only vaginal deliveries, according to the study, published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Surgery journal. Meanwhile, women who have had two or more cesarean deliveries may have an even higher risk of a re-operation following a hysterectomy, researchers found. The study comes at a time when approximately one-third of all births in the United States are deliveries by C-section, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and P...