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Study considers how climate change, shifting winds will impact migratory birds

Study considers how climate change, shifting winds will impact migratory birds

Science
Dec. 11 (UPI) -- New research suggests migratory birds in North America will be more likely to encounter headwinds as they fly southward each fall. However, changing wind patterns will make their springtime return less strenuous. Scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology used radar observations collected at 143 weather stations to measure the altitude, density and direction of birds migrating during spring and fall. The most up-to-date climate models allowed researchers to determine how global warming and its affect on wind patterns will impact birds on the move. "We combined these data to estimate how wind assistance is expected to change during this century under global climate change," Frank La Sorte, a Cornell Lab of Ornithology scientist, said in a news release. "This matters for ...
Good economies bring bad nursing home conditions, study says

Good economies bring bad nursing home conditions, study says

Health
Dec. 7 (UPI) -- As the economy rises, the quality of nursing homes falls, a new study says. An investigation by researchers, published Friday in The Gerontologist, studied over a decade of data and connected a low unemployment rate with the inability of nursing home management to recruit and maintain quality employees due to the physical and mental strain associated with the job. "During economic downturns, many people are willing to take positions with work environments they may not prefer because there aren't many options. But when the economy is good, there are plenty of employment opportunities and taking a nursing home job may not be that attractive," said, Sean Shenghsiu Huang, an assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Nursing & Health Studies and the study's princ...
Hazelnuts boost micronutrient levels in older adults, study says

Hazelnuts boost micronutrient levels in older adults, study says

Health
Dec. 6 (UPI) -- Hazelnuts could raise the micronutrient levels in middle-age and elderly people, new research says. The study, published Wednesday in the Journal of Nutrition, focused on 32 people age 55 and older, who ate two cups of hazelnuts a day for 16 weeks. Results showed increased blood concentrations of magnesium and elevated urinary levels of vitamin E. "This is one of the first times a study of this type has focused only on older adults," Alex Michels, a researcher at Oregon State University's Linus Pauling Institute and study- co-author, said in a news release. "We wanted to fill in a piece of the puzzle -- can hazelnuts improve the nutritional status of older adults specifically?" The researchers also noted a decrease in glucose and "bad" cholesterol, as well as an increase i...
Study: Yo-yo diets can increase death risk

Study: Yo-yo diets can increase death risk

Health
Nov. 29 (UPI) -- Yo-yo dieting can increase the risk of death, according to a new study. For the study, published Thursday in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, researchers at Seoul National University followed 3,700 people for 16 years. They found that weight cycling did make people with obesity have a lower chance of developing diabetes, but they also found a downside to the practice. The loss of weight usually brings on a reduction of energy during exercise and during daily activities. The researchers say this, along with increased hunger, produces a "perfect metabolic storm" for dieters to regain weight. Some experts actually estimate that 80 percent of dieters regain their weight. Weight cycling among people with coronary heart disease can even lead to a higher ris...
YouTube videos about prostate cancer putting patients at risk – study

YouTube videos about prostate cancer putting patients at risk – study

Technology
YouTube videos about prostate cancer are putting patients at risk of harm because of misleading medical information, a team of researchers has claimed. Scientists from the NYU School of Medicine analysed the 150 most-viewed YouTube videos on the disease and reported that 77% had factual errors or biased content in either the video or the comments section.Their work, published in the journal European Urology, found that while 75% of the videos fully described the benefits of different treatments, only 53% warned of their side effects.According to the team, 19% of the videos also recommended alternative and unproven medicines - some of which could directly harm patients.One video promoted "injecting herbs" into the prostate to treat cancer.The researchers said the audiences f...