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Study: World carbon pollution falls 17% during pandemic peak

Study: World carbon pollution falls 17% during pandemic peak

Technology
A new study calculates global carbon emissions declined by 17% at the height of the pandemic shutdownBy SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science WriterMay 19, 2020, 10:04 PM4 min read4 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleKENSINGTON, Maryland -- The world cut its daily carbon dioxide emissions by 17% at the peak of the pandemic shutdown last month, a new study found. But with life and heat-trapping gas levels inching back toward normal, the brief pollution break will likely be “a drop in the ocean" when it comes to climate change, scientists said. In their study of carbon dioxide emissions during the coronavirus pandemic, an international team of scientists calculated that pollution levels are heading back up — and for the year will end up between 4% and 7% lower than 2019 levels
COVID-19 discriminates along racial, socioeconomic lines, study finds

COVID-19 discriminates along racial, socioeconomic lines, study finds

Health
May 15 (UPI) -- Black people, poor people and those living in densely populated areas are up to four times more likely to test positive for COVID-19, an analysis published Friday by The Lancet has found. The study, conducted by British researchers and focusing on trends in the United Kingdom, echoes reports of similar demographic disparities in the United States. "It's important to know which groups in the wider community are most at risk of infection so that we can better understand SARS-CoV-2 transmission and how to prevent new cases," study co-author Dr. Simon de Lusignan, of the University of Oxford, said in a press release. As of Friday afternoon, more than 1.4 million Americans have been infected with the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, and more than 86,000 have died from COVID-19, th...
Poorer, racially diverse neighborhoods more likely to lose health facilities, study finds

Poorer, racially diverse neighborhoods more likely to lose health facilities, study finds

Health
May 15 (UPI) -- Neighborhoods with high black and Hispanic or Latino populations are more likely to lose healthcare facilities, potentially making it more difficult to access care, a new study has found. In research published Friday by JAMA Network Open, the authors observed that these areas had a higher than 50 percent risk for experiencing a healthcare facility closure -- including hospitals, clinics and pharmacies -- than those with predominantly white populations. Similarly, regions with high levels of poverty, based on findings from the U.S. Census in 2000 and 2010, were 12 percent more likely to see needed health facilities close. "There is increasing evidence that racial and ethnic disparities in access to healthcare have been reduced for some subgroups after implementation of the...
Special footwear might reduce pain from knee osteoarthritis, study finds

Special footwear might reduce pain from knee osteoarthritis, study finds

Health
May 12 (UPI) -- Specially designed shoes can help reduce the pain of knee osteoarthritis, a study published Tuesday in JAMA has found. Using biomechanical footwear -- specially designed shoes with a novel sole -- the researchers were able to reduce the pain experienced by those with osteoarthritis, or OA, of the knee by more than 60 percent. "These findings provide strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of a new treatment for knee osteoarthritis," co-author David Felson, a rheumatologist and professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, said in a press release. Knee OA affects approximately 275 million people worldwide, according to the World Health Organization -- most of them older adults. Often called wear-and-tear arthritis, OA causes cartilage, the natural cus...
Climate change: Study pours cold water on oil company net zero claims

Climate change: Study pours cold water on oil company net zero claims

Science
Claims by oil and gas companies that they are curbing their carbon emissions in line with net zero targets are overstated, according to a new review. The independent analysis of six large European corporations acknowledges they have taken big steps on CO2 recently.In April, Shell became the latest to announce ambitious plans to be at net zero for operational emissions by 2050.But the authors say none of the companies are yet aligned with the 1.5C temperature goal. Scientists argue that the global temperature must not rise by more than 1.5C by the end of the century if the world is to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.The research has been carried out by the Transition Pathway Initiative (TPI), an investor-led group whic...