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Tag: success

Farming techniques, not fungus, explain success of leafcutter ants

Farming techniques, not fungus, explain success of leafcutter ants

Science
May 9 (UPI) -- A comprehensive new survey has yielded new insights into the evolutionary success of leafcutter ants, the most advanced of the fungus-growing ants.Leafcutter ants grow the largest colonies, featuring millions of ants, and produce the most diversified workforce. Until now, scientists have credited their fungus with the group's empowerment. But new research suggests the same fungus is cultivated by other less sophisticated ant species.It is a combination of unique -- but still poorly understood -- cultivation techniques that explains the evolution of the leafcutter ants, researchers argue in a new paper, published this week in the journal Molecular Ecology.Genetic analysis of all 47 leafcutter ant species, from colonies and nests in Brazil, Texas and everywhere in-between, sug...
Keeping livers 'alive' boosts transplant success, trial finds

Keeping livers 'alive' boosts transplant success, trial finds

Health
Keeping donated livers "alive" with a machine prior to transplants boosts the chances of a successful operation, a landmark trial has found.Usually livers are kept in ice prior before the surgery, but many become damaged and unusable as a result. For this study, scientists put them in a perfusion machine, pumping the organs with blood, nutrients and medicines.More of these "warm" livers went on to be transplanted and showed less damage than the "cold" ones, the trial found.Scientists said the study could help to reduce the significant proportion of people who die waiting for a new liver and potentially "transform" how organ transplants are carried out. Record number of organ donors in 2017'Warmed liver' transplant first'Major impact'The randomised controlled trial involved 222 liver tran...
Cheltenham Festival: Native River romps to Gold Cup success

Cheltenham Festival: Native River romps to Gold Cup success

Sports
Native River won a thrilling Cheltenham Gold Cup after an epic duel with Might Bite.The 5-1 chance gave Dorset trainer Colin Tizzard his first victory in the race after some spectacular jumping under champion jockey Richard Johnson.Favourite Might Bite (4-1), seeking a historic Cheltenham Festival treble for trainer Nicky Henderson, was a gallant runner-up, beaten by four and a half lengths.Anibale Fly (33-1) finished third ahead of Road To Respect and Djakadam.Read more: 'Tizzard gives Cheltenham a gold top'Podcast: 'A Gold Cup that lived up to the hype'Read more: Jockey wins despite dislocated shoulderBut the race was all about the memorable battle between last year's third-placed horse Native River and King George VI Chase winner Might Bite.The pair led from the front, roared on by a se...
How Jade Bird went from 'brutal' open mic gigs to the Brit School and US success

How Jade Bird went from 'brutal' open mic gigs to the Brit School and US success

Entertainment
Here's a list of things that make Jade Bird laugh during our conversation: Coats, chickens, theatre school, her own songs, other people's songs, yoghurt, bathrooms, being cheated on, her grandmother's guitar and writer's block.The 20-year-old is vivacious and chatty and frequently hilarious - characteristics that have earned her legions of fans when she plays live (which is all the time)."I've often been told that if music doesn't work out I could be a comedian," she guffaws. "I'm like, 'Thank you so much... Or maybe not?!'"Stand-up's loss is music's gain. The singer's British spin on Americana is compelling and gutsy, combining her love of Loretta Lynn with the punky energy of Patti Smith.It's already caused a fuss in the US, where Rolling Stone named her a "country artist you need to kno...
Female engineers set for success

Female engineers set for success

Science
Fewer than one in 10 engineers in the UK are female - the lowest percentage in Europe, according to the Women's Engineering Society. Latvia, Bulgaria and Cyprus lead with nearly 30%. Here, two pioneering female engineers at Oxford University explain what drives them.Priyanka Dhopade was named as one of the top 50 Women in Engineering Under 35 in 2017, as chosen by the Women's Engineering Society. She grew up in Canada, where she studied for a degree in aerospace engineering. She completed a PhD at Monash University in Melbourne before moving to Oxford in 2013.As a child I was very interested in aeroplanes, and how things fly in space - I wanted to be an astronaut. My parents suggested engineering, because it's quite practical. I could use my enthusiasm and my skills to do something that's ...