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Tag: survive

MLB Postseason Roundup: Red Sox survive, Dodgers cruise

MLB Postseason Roundup: Red Sox survive, Dodgers cruise

Sports
Oct. 5 (UPI) -- The Houston Astros picked up right where they left off, defeating the Cleveland Indians 7-2 on Friday in Game 1 of the AL Division Series at Minute Maid Park. The Astros -- behind George Springer, Jose Altuve and Alex Bregman -- clobbered four home runs to earn their first postseason victory this season in defense of their World Series title last year. Houston had a World Series-record 15 home runs in winning their first championship last season, and continued their postseason power surge. "As much as I've heard different opinions about our offense, it's pretty big, it's pretty good, it's pretty potent," Astros manager AJ Hinch said to reporters. "Case in point today." Bregman opened the contest with a 396-foot homer to left field in the bottom of the fourth inning. Josh ...
Small ice-free oasis helped Arctic marine life survive last ice age

Small ice-free oasis helped Arctic marine life survive last ice age

Science
Sept. 28 (UPI) -- New analysis suggests a small corridor between Norway and the British Isles remained ice-free during the last ice age, offering an oasis of sorts for marine life. "When we were looking for evidence of biological life in sediments at the bottom of the ocean, we found that between the sea ice covered oceans, and the ice sheets on land, there must have been a narrow ice-free corridor," Jochen Knies, a research scientist at the Arctic University of Norway and Geological Survey of Norway, said in a news release. Last week, Arctic sea ice shrank to its lowest point this year, the sixth smallest summertime minimum extent in modern history. But during the last ice age, Arctic sea ice was much more expansive, spreading across almost all of the North Sea. But sediment cores sugges...
Coastal wetlands must migrate inland to survive climate change

Coastal wetlands must migrate inland to survive climate change

Science
Sept. 12 (UPI) -- If coastal wetlands are to survive climate change -- and continue to provide a bounty of ecological benefits -- they most move inland, according to a new study. Previous studies have suggested many coastal wetlands are likely to be wiped out by encroaching salt water as global warming accelerates sea level rise. But new analysis suggests many marshes and mangroves could be saved if they were able to move farther inland. That's good news, as wetlands help absorb excess CO2 and serve as a vital buffer against damaging storms and flooding. Some studies have shown wetlands save hundreds of lives and millions of dollars. To better understand the fates of coastal wetlands, an international team of scientists collected and analyzed data from the around the world. Researchers lo...
Costa scores fortuitous goal as Spain survive Iran scare – report & highlights

Costa scores fortuitous goal as Spain survive Iran scare – report & highlights

Sports
Media playback is not supported on this device Spain edged out a gallant Iran in an absorbing contest to ensure they will reach the World Cup knockout stage with a draw in their final group game.The 2010 champions needed a fortuitous Diego Costa goal after half-time, having been frustrated in an opening period in which they had 81% of possession.Iran, who defended admirably until the ball ricocheted in off Costa, instantly showed more intent and thought they had levelled, only for Saeid Ezatolahi's strike to be ruled out for offside. Carlos Queiroz's Iran side had gone...
Miniature human brain implants survive, grow inside mice for months

Miniature human brain implants survive, grow inside mice for months

Science
April 16 (UPI) -- Miniature human brains, or human brain organoids, can survive and grow after being implanted in the skulls of mice. It's the first time human cerebral organoids have been installed inside another species.Researchers describe the breakthrough in a new paper published Monday in the journal Nature Biotechnology.Scientists grew the pea-sized brains from stem cells and then placed them inside the skulls of mice. Researchers removed a small amount of tissue to make room for the miniature brains. Tiny, transparent windows in the skulls of the test mice allowed scientists to keep tabs on the brain implants -- the organoids were also designed to express a green fluorescent protein, causing them to glow inside the mice skulls.Roughly 80 percent of the implants were successfully rec...