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German covettes to receive OTO 76/62 Super Rapid naval gun system

German covettes to receive OTO 76/62 Super Rapid naval gun system

Business
Nov. 1 (UPI) -- Leonardo announced a deal on Thursday to mount its new defense gun system on new German naval ships. The new deal calls on Leonardo to provide seven OTO 76/62 Super Rapid systems to equip the new K130 corvettes of the German Navy. "The signing of the contract strengthens the historical collaboration with the country and with the Agency," the company said in a press release. "Leonardo has indeed provided the first naval artillery systems, in particular the 76/62 Compact, starting from the 70s; the most recent supplies include the 127/64 Vulcano naval guns and the Hitrole 12.7 turrets currently on board the F125 Frigate." Leonardo's OTO 76/62 is powered by a control console that can be incorporated into any type and class of ship, even smaller units. The system's medium-cali...
Climate change: Low cost, low energy cooling system shows promise

Climate change: Low cost, low energy cooling system shows promise

Science
Researchers in the US have scaled up a new low-cost system that could provide efficient cooling for homes while using very little electricity.The team has developed a roof-top sized array, built from a highly reflective material made from glass and polymers.In tests, the system kept water around 10C cooler than the ambient air when exposed to midday sunlight in summer. The approach could also be scaled up to cool power stations and data centres.The system is based around what's termed a cooling meta-material, which is essentially an engineered film not found in nature. Last year, researchers at CU Boulder in the US published research on the extraordinary properties of the new film, which reflects back almost all incoming light fr...
Rapid heart imaging system may improve care in developing nations

Rapid heart imaging system may improve care in developing nations

Health
Aug. 29 (UPI) -- A rapid imaging system could improve heart healthcare in developing nations because of reduced costs and easier availability, according to a study in Peru. Researchers determined the new system, which uses contrast dye to measure cardiac structure, function and scarring, was effective at a fraction of the costs and time required for the traditional imaging system. The findings were published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Heart Association. In Peru, 16 percent of the population has cardiovascular disease, researchers say, but screening people there for heart conditions can be difficult. The Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging system, also called cardiac MRIs, are often not available for people in Peru and other developing nations. The method provides detailed inf...
Galileo: Funding pledge for UK rival to EU sat-nav system

Galileo: Funding pledge for UK rival to EU sat-nav system

Science
Funding for the UK's own satellite navigation system to rival the European Union's Galileo project is expected to be announced.It comes after the UK was told it would not be able to access the EU-wide programme after Brexit next March.At least £92m has been promised by the Treasury to plan for a UK system, a government official has told the BBC.The UK has already spent 1.4bn euros (£1.2bn) on Galileo, Europe's answer to the US GPS system.Costs for a UK-only sat-nav system are likely to run to several billion pounds.Head-startA feasibility study to work out what a UK programme might look like would cost around £100m alone, according to the official.While the UK would prefer to remain in Galileo as part of a stron...
Immigrants cost the health care system less than US-born Americans: Study

Immigrants cost the health care system less than US-born Americans: Study

Health
Slightly over half of Americans — 52 percent — believe that immigrants are a financial burden on the U.S. healthcare system, and two thirds believe that undocumented immigrants should not be eligible for social services provided by state and local governments. A study published Thursday in the International Journal of Health Services finds that immigrants actually use far less healthcare resources than non-immigrants, and may actually subsidize the health care of U.S. citizens. Researchers at Harvard Medical School and Tufts University assessed all peer-reviewed studies since 2000 related to healthcare costs by immigrants in the United States. The authors found that across all age groups, immigrants’ overall healthcare costs were one-half to two-thirds those of people ...