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Tag: taking

How e-commerce with drone delivery is taking flight in China

How e-commerce with drone delivery is taking flight in China

Finance
LATE on a Monday morning the village of Zhangwei is quiet. Chickens scratch and cluck at the side of the road. Workers use wooden spades to spread grain on the highway to dry, using half its width so that traffic can still pass on the other side. Yet at the community centre at the village’s heart, two objects hint at a feat of ultra-modern logistics about to unfold: a circle of green astroturf laid down in the central courtyard, and a billboard on the front of the building bearing the logo of JD.com, China’s second-largest online retailer.A low whirr breaks the stillness as a spiky dot appears on the horizon. The drone arrives overhead with a roar, hovers for a moment, then lowers itself towards the green circle like a mantis, three sets of propellers churning the air into whor...
Taking a year off at 38, with a plan to retire at 48

Taking a year off at 38, with a plan to retire at 48

Finance
Planning young: a retirement roadmapApril 20 is Scott Sherman's 38th birthday. His gift to himself? Quitting his 9-to-5 job for a year. Even though Sherman is on track to retire early — he anticipates reaching financial independence by 48 — he wants to start living on his terms now. So he's taking up to a year off to live at a slower pace, volunteer, spend time with his kids and consider his next move. "I could stay doing what I'm doing now and be comfortable and probably bored," says Sherman, who works in IT administration at a university in Utah and writes about his journey toward financial independence on his blog. "Or I can do something scary, spend a little money and figure out how to spend eight hours a day doing something I'm really excited about." Sherman and his wife have been p
5 Supermarkets Share the Secret Store Policies You Should Be Taking Advantage Of

5 Supermarkets Share the Secret Store Policies You Should Be Taking Advantage Of

Health
Almost every week, you can find me zipping through the aisles of my local Trader Joe's as I look for the healthiest food to pile into my cart.Given the unending crowds that Trader Joe's is famous for, I often whiz right past the new products that the retailer puts out (like those butternut fries). But recently, an employee saw me eyeing some sliced oven-roasted turkey that I hadn't seen before, and he asked if I wanted to try it.I was shocked when he ripped open the package right on the spot and offered me a slice. Then he explained that Trader Joe's customers can actually try most products before buying them. For free. I was floored. This is on a whole other level than those sad samples they plop into paper cups at most stores.Before you go hog-wild: The policy doesn't apply to alcoholic ...
Blue Matcha Is Taking Over Instagram—But There’s a Catch

Blue Matcha Is Taking Over Instagram—But There’s a Catch

Health
If you follow the latest foodie trends on Instagram, this probably isn’t the first time you’ve heard about blue matcha. The indigo powder is popping up in beautiful photos of teas, juices, and smoothie bowls that give off serious mermaid vibes. But you might be wondering, What exactly is it? And does it boast the same great health perks as green matcha?Green matcha—which is made from the leaves of green tea—is loaded with antioxidants that have been tied to improved metabolism, anti-aging benefits, blood sugar regulation, blood pressure reduction, and protection against cancer and heart disease (whew). Matcha is also famous for its caffeine content and the "alert calm" it's said to induce, thanks to a natural substance it contains called l-theanine, which prom
Ashes: Joe Root refuses to write off England’s hopes despite Australia taking 2-0 series lead in Adelaide

Ashes: Joe Root refuses to write off England’s hopes despite Australia taking 2-0 series lead in Adelaide

Sports
Joe Root insists England are still "massively" in the Ashes series despite falling 2-0 behind with a 120-run defeat in the second Test.England arrived on the final day at the Adelaide Oval with an outside chance of sustaining their revival in the inaugural pink-ball Ashes encounter.But after conceding a 215-run first-innings deficit, even James Anderson's maiden five-wicket haul in Australia and then a battling half-century from the England captain himself could not truly turn back the tide.DAY FIVE REPORT: England hope quickly extinguished as Australia storm into 2-0 series leadRoot was unbeaten at stumps on the penultimate night, with 178 still needed and six wickets intact to pull off a national-record run chase of 354 to level the series.Instead, he followed nightwatchman Chris Wo...