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Tag: technique

Technique pioneered to tackle disease threatening half the world

Technique pioneered to tackle disease threatening half the world

Technology
Scientists are working on a pioneering programme aimed at tackling one of the world's most damaging diseases.Dengue fever is a viral infection that can look like severe flu, the symptoms of which include high fever, headache, joint pain and a rash. A 2013 study found that up to 528 million people are infected with dengue fever every year, up to 96 million of which required medical treatment. Image: An aedes aegypti mosquito. Pic: James Gathany/CDC And there is evidence the disease is spreading, with some experts predicting it could be present in western Europe, and even the UK, in the coming decades.At the Institute for Medical Research in the heart of Kuala Lumpur, a team of researchers led by Dr Nazni Wasi Ahmad has scientifically e...
Scientists are trying to perfect a technique for growing crops in space

Scientists are trying to perfect a technique for growing crops in space

Technology
This story is from Inside Science. Scientists in Norway and the Netherlands may have brought us closer to workable space farms, which experts agree are necessary if astronauts are ever going to reach the red planet. "Astronauts stay on the International Space Station for six months and they can bring everything they need in either freeze-dried or vacuum packs, but the next goal for all space agencies is to reach Mars where travel is much longer," explained Silje Wolff, a plant physiologist at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Space in Trondheim, Norway. In the best possible conditions, it would take a spacecraft between six and nine months to reach Mars and the same to get back -- not to mention the additional months they would likely spend there. "It's very challenging, ...
New technique helps injured hearts regenerate via stem cells

New technique helps injured hearts regenerate via stem cells

Health
April 23 (UPI) -- Engineers have developed a new way to help injured hearts regenerate using cells derived from human stem cells, potentially leading to better treatments for cardiac medical conditions.Researchers at the Columbia School of Engineering and Applied Science found a way to treat the heart without implanting the cells, because in the past they didn't work well with the heart and can cause abnormal heart rhythm. Instead they applied extracellular vesicles -- a small structure within a cell -- secreted by cardiomyocytes, which make up the cardiac muscle cells.Their findings were published Monday in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering."We reasoned that the cardiomyocytes would be the best source of molecules driving the recovery of injured heart, as it is well known that the...
Gene-editing patient applications closer with new technique

Gene-editing patient applications closer with new technique

Health
April 13 (UPI) -- A new technique in gene editing greatly improves the technology's precision, so much so that it may one day treat some genetic diseases, according to a new study.At the University of Alberta, researchers have improved the accuracy using the guided biomachine in the body to seek out defective gene sequences in each cell and edit in the correct information. Their findings were published Friday in Nature Communications.They have filed a patent on their discovery and want to partner with a pharmaceutical company to use it for treatment of diseases, including muscular dystrophy, hemophilia and some cancers.The tool called Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, or CRISPR, combines a scissor-like protein called Cas9 and a guide molecule that seeks a precise s...
Bridge collapse puts spotlight on rapid building technique

Bridge collapse puts spotlight on rapid building technique

Technology
As the 950-ton concrete bridge section was swung into place over a highway last weekend, Florida International University officials were beaming with pride. The pedestrian bridge on the edge of the Miami-area campus was a signature achievement of the school's Accelerated Bridge Construction University Transportation Center, a research group set up with federal funding a few years ago to show how spans could be built faster and cheaper in the U.S. "FIU is about building bridges and student safety. This project accomplishes our mission beautifully," FIU President Mark B. Rosenberg boasted that day. "We are filled with pride and satisfaction at seeing this engineering feat come to life and connect our campus to the surrounding community." Five days later, the bridge collapsed onto the busy s...