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Tag: technology

Scientists use DNA technology to build tough 3D nanomaterials

Scientists use DNA technology to build tough 3D nanomaterials

Science
March 19 (UPI) -- Researchers at Columbia University have found a way to marry the versatility of DNA nanotechnology with the toughness of silica-based materials. DNA technology can be used to design self-assembling, complexly organized nanoparticle structures. Advertisement In theory, these structures can be designed for a variety of applications, but in reality, these structures are too soft and only stable in specific environs -- limiting their usefulness. Scientists described the novel fabrication process in a new paper, published Friday in the journal Science Advances. "A significant level of designability at nanoscale, through our assembly approach, combined with demonstrated robustness, opens opportunities to build targeted 3D nanomaterials from nanoparticles," Oleg Gang, professo...
New radiation vest technology protects astronauts, doctors

New radiation vest technology protects astronauts, doctors

Science
ORLANDO, Fla., Dec. 24 (UPI) -- NASA is testing a space radiation protection vest aboard the International Space Station that could shield astronauts from deadly solar flares on missions to the moon and Mars. Solar storms with high doses of radiation are among the biggest threats to astronauts on deep space missions. The worst such storms could make space flyers too sick to function and eventually kill them. Advertisement The new vest is designed with flexible polyethylene shapes to fit men or women and protect their most vulnerable organs. "We are trying to see if astronauts can wear it as long as possible, without experiencing pain or discomfort," said Oren Milstein, co-founder and CEO of vest maker StemRad, which is based in Tampa and in Tel Aviv, Israel. "Several astronauts will wear...
Bristol dinosaur’s brain rebuilt using digital technology

Bristol dinosaur’s brain rebuilt using digital technology

Technology
Digital technology has been used to rebuild the brain of Thecodontosaurus, giving new insights into one of the earliest dinosaurs to roam the planet.Better known as the Bristol dinosaur after its fossils were found in the city in the 1830s, it was only the fourth dinosaur to be named. Research now suggests it may have eaten meat and moved fast on two legs - after palaeontologists used 3D modelling and advanced imaging of fossils to reconstruct its brain.They concluded the small dinosaur was possibly carnivorous, unlike its giant long-necked later relatives Diplodocus and Brontosaurus, which only fed on plants.Antonio Ballell, lead author of the University of Bristol study, said: "Our analysis of Thecodontosaurus' brain uncovered many fascinating features, some of which were quite surprisin...
‘VAR is making football rotten and I don’t understand the game’ says Tony Cascarino, who rants that technology is destroying football’s ‘soul’

‘VAR is making football rotten and I don’t understand the game’ says Tony Cascarino, who rants that technology is destroying football’s ‘soul’

Sports
Tony Cascarino believes VAR is making football ‘rotten’, with many fans – including himself – being turned away from the beautiful game due to technology.There was controversy once again in the Premier League on Saturday, as Casc’s beloved Liverpool were denied a win at Brighton by an injury time penalty equaliser. Pascal Gross stepped up to fire the spot kick past Alisson, cancelling out Diogo Jota’s 60th minute opener and securing the Seagulls a share of the spoils. Getty Images - Getty Gross’ strike from the spot secured Brighton a point at the Amex Neal Maupay had earlier missed another penalty which would have fired Brighton into the lead, while Mohamed Salah also had a possible opening goal ruled out for offside after a VAR review. And then, after Jo...
Robots help seniors learn to use technology in South Korea

Robots help seniors learn to use technology in South Korea

World
SEOUL, Nov. 9 (UPI) -- In South Korea, one of the most digitally connected societies in the world, the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the growth of contactless technology in everyday life. But one group is finding itself struggling in a fast-changing world of communications apps, fast food-ordering kiosks and robot waiters: senior citizens. The Seoul city government is trying to help bridge the digital divide with a new program that uses specially designed robots to teach seniors how to use smartphones and touchscreen kiosks. The program, which will teach 3,000 participants over the next three months at 17 facilities, launched last week. Advertisement "Our goal is closing the digital gap between young people and seniors," said Shin Eun-kyong, business outreach manager of the Seoul Digi...