News That Matters

Tag: their

Western companies are getting creative with their Chinese names

Western companies are getting creative with their Chinese names

Finance
MCDONALD’S drew ridicule in China when it changed its registered name there to Jingongmen, or “Golden Arches”, in October, after it was sold to a Chinese consortium. Some on Weibo, a microblogging site, thought it sounded old-fashioned and awkward, others that it had connotations of furniture. The fast-food chain was quick to reassure customers that its restaurants would continue to go by Maidanglao, a rough transliteration that has, over the years, become a recognisable brand name. But for most companies now entering Chinese markets, transliterations are a thing of the past, says Amanda Liu, vice-president of Labbrand, a consultancy based in Shanghai that advises firms on brand names.Companies are instead choosing Chinese names with meanings that capture people’s imagination. That often i
How airlines are squeezing more seats onto their planes

How airlines are squeezing more seats onto their planes

Finance
WHEN Gary Leff, a prominent travel blogger, took his first flight on one of the new “no legroom” planes operated by American Airlines, he found that the experience was not nearly as bad as he feared. American had drawn howls of protest from customers when it announced it was reducing the distance between rows of seats—“seat pitch”, in industry jargon—on its new Boeing 737 Max planes to 29 inches, compared with the 31-inch pitch on its existing 737-800s. So in June it capitulated, and settled on 30 inches. Mr Leff tried out these new seats last week and was pleasantly surprised to find that “the seats themselves are no worse than” in American’s current layout in economy. That may seem counterintuitive, but aircraft-interior designers had come to American’s rescue. New thinner seats have ena
Gorillas can learn to clean food on their own, without social cues

Gorillas can learn to clean food on their own, without social cues

Science
Dec. 4 (UPI) -- Gorillas don't need to witnesses others cleaning their food to adopt the behavior. They can learn it on their own -- spontaneously.Many of the gorilla's abilities are thought to be socially acquired, including food cleaning behavior. But during a series of tests, researchers found gorillas cleaned sand from a dirty apple 75 percent of the time."In four of our five gorillas, at least one of the techniques for cleaning was similar to that observed in the wild," Damien Neadle, a researcher at the University of Birmingham, said in a news release. "Given that these two groups are culturally unconnected, it suggests that social learning is not required for this behavior to emerge."Scientists suggest their findings -- published this week in the journal PLoS One -- don't diminish t...
Young people out of love with their own bodies, says report

Young people out of love with their own bodies, says report

Health
Body dissatisfaction can start as young as six and lead to depression, anxiety and eating issues, MPs will be told.The Youth Select Committee urged the government to recognise the seriousness of body image fears, before young people suffered a long-term impact.It is launching its report into the issue, A Body Confident Future, as part of the annual Parliament Week.One expert said it was now normal for young people "to be unhappy with the way their bodies look".Dr Phillippa Diedrichs, associate professor at the Centre for Appearance Research, University of the West of England, added that body dissatisfaction was the biggest known risk factor for eating disorders such as bulimia. "It is a really important mental health issue, and I don't think it is taken seriously enough," she said.There ar...
Millennials are doing better than the baby-boomers did at their age

Millennials are doing better than the baby-boomers did at their age

Finance
ALL men are created equal, but they do not stay that way for long. That is one message of a report this month by the OECD, a club of 35 mostly rich democracies. Many studies show how income gaps have evolved over time or between countries. The OECD’s report looks instead at how inequality evolves with age.As people build their careers, or don’t, their incomes tend to diverge. This inequality peaks when a generation reaches its late 50s. But it tends to fall thereafter, as people draw redistributive public pensions and quit the rat race, a contest that tends to give more unto every one that hath. Old age, the OECD notes, is a “leveller”.Will it remain so? Retirement, after all, flattens incomes not by redistributing from rich seniors to poor, but by transferring money to old people from you