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Ice sheets in Patagonia are more massive than scientists thought

Ice sheets in Patagonia are more massive than scientists thought

Science
June 4 (UPI) -- A seven-year survey of Patagonia's ice suggests the slabs of ice that stretch across vast portions of Argentina and Chile are thicker than scientists thought, measuring more than a mile in thickness in some places. "We did not think the ice fields on the Patagonian plateau could be quite that substantial," Eric Rignot, professor of earth sciences at the University of California, Irvine, said in a news release. "As a result of this multinational research project, we found that -- added together -- the northern and southern portions of Patagonia clearly hold more ice than anticipated, roughly 40 times the ice volume of the European Alps." Measurements collected using satellite radar altimetry and optical imagery suggest most of Patagonia's ice sheets have been rapidly thinn...
Ariel Winter looks unrecognisable with red hair: ‘I thought this was Bella Thorne!’

Ariel Winter looks unrecognisable with red hair: ‘I thought this was Bella Thorne!’

Entertainment
Most know her as Alex Dunphy from hit comedy TV series Modern Family. But now Ariel Winters is all grown up - and looks completely different from the geeky teen character we know and love. The 21-year-old took to Instagram over the weekend to share a transformation shot, looking almost unrecognisable with a new ‘do. Since landing a role on the hit show aged 10, she has always worn her hair in long, black layers.  Related Articles In the snap posted, fans were surprised to see that her hair was a light shade of ginger, falling around her face in surfer waves. As the photo was taken in her hair salon in Los Angeles, California, it seemed to have been a fresh haircut. On top, she wore a racy black top with a deep plunge neckline. A pair of simple blue den
Greenland ice melting faster than previously thought: study

Greenland ice melting faster than previously thought: study

Science
Jan. 22 (UPI) -- The Greenland Ice Sheet is melting faster than scientists had previously thought - a lot faster. According to a new study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the Greenland Ice Sheet is now melting four times faster than it had been prior to 2003, National Geographic reported. The largest amount of ice loss between 2003 to mid-2013 occurred at the southwest region of the world's largest island where few glaciers are located. Most of the ice melt came from from an area where ice loss wasn't known to occur rapidly. "We knew we had one big problem with increasing rates of ice discharge by some large outlet glaciers," Ohio State University geoscientist and lead writer on the paper Michael Bevis said. "But now we recognize a second serious p...
South Asian Monsoon affects more people in Southern Hemisphere than once thought

South Asian Monsoon affects more people in Southern Hemisphere than once thought

Science
Nov. 9 (UPI) -- Warming in the southern hemisphere of Asia has a stronger affect on monsoon strength than scientists previously thought, a discovery that could have a devastating affect billions of people, according to a new study. A team of researchers from Georgia State University, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel in Germany, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Brown University rebuilt the eastern Indian Ocean's precipitation history by examining ancient sediment core from the eastern Indian Ocean. Each year, between June and September, the South Asian Monsoon dumps heavy rainfall on the region. A half year of drought and a negative economic, social and environmental impact for India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Pakistan and Sri Lanka follow the downpour. The monsoon'...
Study: Oceans warming 60 percent more than previously thought

Study: Oceans warming 60 percent more than previously thought

Science
Oct. 31 (UPI) -- The world's oceans may be heating up at a faster pace than previously thought, leaving the planet less time to avoid catastrophic global warming, according to a study published Wednesday. The study published in the journal Nature by scientists at Princeton University, University of California San Diego's Scripps Institution of Oceanography and other research centers found that the earth's oceans have retained 60 percent more heat each year over the past quarter century than previously determined by scientists. "We thought that we got away with not a lot of warming in both the ocean and the atmosphere for the amount of [carbon dioxide] that we emitted," one of the report's authors, Princeton geoscientist Laure Resplandy. told The Washington Post. "But we were wrong. The pl...