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Warming toll: 1 degree hotter, trillions of tons of ice gone

Warming toll: 1 degree hotter, trillions of tons of ice gone

Technology
The world has gotten hotter, lost trillions of tons of ice and suffered more weather disasters since climate negotiations startedBy BY SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science WriterDecember 1, 2019, 10:05 AM3 min read Since leaders first started talking about tackling the problem of climate change, the world has spewed more heat-trapping gases, gotten hotter and suffered hundreds of extreme weather disasters. Fires have burned, ice has melted and seas have grown. The first United Nations diplomatic conference to tackle climate change was in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. Here’s what’s happened to Earth since: — The carbon dioxide level in the air has jumped from about 358 parts per million to nearly 412, according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. That’s a 15% rise in 27 yea
Area in Africa responsible for 1 billion tons of carbon emissions

Area in Africa responsible for 1 billion tons of carbon emissions

Science
Aug. 13 (UPI) -- New analysis of satellite data suggests between 1 and 1.5 billion tons of carbon emissions is emitted from northern tropical Africa each year. The latest research, published this week in the journal Nature Communications, suggests land use changes and drought have degraded the region's soil, leading to the release of large quantities of stored carbon. However, scientists say soil degradation alone isn't responsible for the region's carbon emissions. To identify other sources of released carbon, study authors suggest more research is necessary. Scientists quantified the land's contribution to global emissions by analyzing data collected by the Japanese Space Agency's Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite and NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory. Researchers compared the sat...
Watch billions of tons of ice collapse at once: Climate change impact on Greenland

Watch billions of tons of ice collapse at once: Climate change impact on Greenland

World
Perched on a cliff above Greenland’s Helheim glacier, I tried calling my wife in New York on a satellite phone. Before I could leave a message, an explosion broke the arctic silence. More explosions followed. I ran across a muddy tundra to a video camera on a tripod overlooking the glacier and ripped off the trash bag I had used to protect it. I hit record as fast as I could focus. The popping sounds morphed into a low rumble. Over the next half hour, the ice broke apart and a four-mile wide chunk tumbled into the sea in a process called calving - one rarely witnessed on this scale. As a Reuters photographer, I have captured erupting volcanoes, the aftermath of hurricanes and tornadoes, and war, but I have never felt so small. It was a poignant end to a months-long project e...