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Pig hearts transplanted into baboons – could humans be next?

Pig hearts transplanted into baboons – could humans be next?

Technology
Pig hearts have been transplanted into baboons - a development that could pave the way for humans to receive porcine organs in future. Researchers from Germany, Sweden and Switzerland said two Anubis baboons had survived for six months, while another two lived for at least three months.Previously, the longest a baboon had survived after such a procedure was 57 days.Since then, genetic modifications have been made to the hearts and a new transplant technique has been developed. Image: The transplant procedure was refined during three trials. File pic The pigs were modified so that they produced a human version of two proteins which block an immune response in alien cells.It was also ensured that they generated thrombomo...
First esophagus grown from stem cells transplanted into mice

First esophagus grown from stem cells transplanted into mice

Health
Oct. 18 (UPI) -- Researchers for the first time have grown a functional esophagus from stem cells and transplanted the food pipe successfully in mice. This engineering process could pave the way to the creation of lab-grown food pipes for children with congenital and acquired gut conditions, according to researchers at the University of College London's Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health. The development could help reduce the need for donated organs, which are often in short supply -- especially for pediatric patients -- and significantly lowers the risk of a donor organ being rejected by the patient's body. A paper on the work, conducted by researchers at UCL, as well as the Great Ormond Street Hospital and the Francis Crick Institute, was published this week in the journal Na...
Research: Progress lagging in transplanted kidney survival

Research: Progress lagging in transplanted kidney survival

Health
July 24 (UPI) -- Despite an improved lifespan of transplanted kidneys during the past 30 years, progress is stagnating, according to an international study. Researchers studied data from 108,787 recipients of kidney transplants from 1986-2016 at 135 hospitals across 21 European countries. The findings were published Monday in the journal Kidney International. Between 1986 and 1999, 87 percent of them functioned after one year and 75 percent after five years. From 2006 to 2015, it had improved to 92 percent after one year and 84 percent after five years. But according to kidney special Dr. Maarten Naesens of Leuven and University Hospitals Leuven, that is not good enough. "For the most part, this progress was made in the period 1986-2000," Naesens said. "Unfortunately, we haven't seen muc...