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Tag: treatment

Tanezumab safe and effective in the treatment of chronic lower-back pain, study finds

Tanezumab safe and effective in the treatment of chronic lower-back pain, study finds

Health
June 19 (UPI) -- Tanezumab appears to reduce chronic back pain, according to a study published Friday in the journal Pain. The drug is a monoclonal antibody and doesn't have the same potentially serious side effects of other drugs used in chronic back pain, including opioids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, researchers said. Advertisement "This demonstration of efficacy is a major breakthrough in the global search to develop non-opioid treatments for chronic pain," study co-author Dr. John Markman, said in a statement. "There were also improvements in function linked to the reduction in pain severity," said Markman, director of the Translational Pain Research Program at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Some 13 percent of all adults aged 20 to 69 years in t...
British Airways’ treatment of staff ‘a disgrace’ – MPs

British Airways’ treatment of staff ‘a disgrace’ – MPs

Business
British Airways' treatment of staff during the coronavirus crisis "is a national disgrace", MPs have claimed.A Transport Select Committee report accuses the airline of a "calculated attempt to take advantage" of the pandemic by cutting thousands of jobs and downgrading terms and conditions.BA said it was doing all it could to keep "the maximum number of jobs".But the MPs said the airline's actions fell "well below the standards we would expect from any employer".The aviation industry has been one of the hardest-hit since the pandemic forced a lockdown. Airlines including EasyJet, Ryanair, and Virgin Atlantic, and suppliers Rolls-Royce and Airbus, have announced thousands of job cuts.BA plans a major restructuring, which could mea...
Coronavirus: Immune clue sparks treatment hope

Coronavirus: Immune clue sparks treatment hope

Health
UK scientists are to begin testing a treatment that it is hoped could counter the effects of Covid-19 in the most seriously ill patients.It has been found those with the most severe form of the disease have extremely low numbers of an immune cell called a T-cell. T-cells clear infection from the body.The clinical trial will evaluate if a drug called interleukin 7, known to boost T-cell numbers, can aid patients' recovery.It involves scientists from the Francis Crick Institute, King's College London and Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital.They have looked at immune cells in the blood of 60 Covid-19 patients and found an apparent crash in the numbers of T-cells. Prof Adrian Hayday from the Crick Institute said it was a "great surprise" to see what was happening w...
Coronavirus: UK hospital trials new treatment drug

Coronavirus: UK hospital trials new treatment drug

Health
A new drug developed by UK scientists to treat Covid-19 patients is being trialled at University Hospital Southampton. Developed by UK bio-tech company Synairgen, it uses a protein called interferon beta, which our bodies produce when we get a viral infection. Initial results from the trial are expected by the end of June.There are currently few effective treatments for coronavirus with doctors relying on patients' immune systems.What is the new drug?Interferon beta is part of the body's first line of defence against viruses, warning it to expect a viral attack, explains Richard Marsden, chief executive of Southampton-based Synairgen.He says the coronavirus seems to suppress its production as part of its strategy to evade our imm...
Microneedle device could deliver “life-saving” treatment to diseased fruit plants

Microneedle device could deliver “life-saving” treatment to diseased fruit plants

Science
April 27 (UPI) -- Massachusetts Institute of Technology engineers have developed a precision injection system for plants to potentially help orange, olive and banana crops threatened by diseases. The new system uses silk-based biomaterials to fabricate a microneedle-like device, which can inject nutrients, antibiotics or other pesticides into plants' circulatory systems, according to a study describing the system, published this month in the journal Advanced Science. Researchers say the device could be used to start delivering "life-saving treatments" to orange, olive and banana crops under threat by diseases that affect their circulatory systems. "We wanted to solve the technical problem of how you can have a precise access to the plant vasculature," graduate student Yunteng Cao, who le...